Bridging the Gap: Using Microsociological Theory to Understand How Expressed Emotion Predicts Clinical Outcomes

Bridging the Gap: Using Microsociological Theory to Understand How Expressed Emotion Predicts... Research has shown that expressed emotion (EE) among families is a strong predictor of relapse for people with severe mental illness. Recent studies have also found the presence of EE in consumer–provider relationships. Despite high consistency in the findings related to EE and relapse, the concept has weak validity as little is known about how exactly it triggers relapse. Microsociological theory provides a framework with which to analyze social interaction and, more specifically, understand how interactions relate to the emotions of pride and shame. By identifying the components of interaction rituals, the theory provides insight into the key processes underlying EE and demonstrates how methodologies based on direct observation have the potential to measure EE with greater validity. This article describes how microsociological theory can be applied to the concept of EE. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Bridging the Gap: Using Microsociological Theory to Understand How Expressed Emotion Predicts Clinical Outcomes

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-006-9032-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research has shown that expressed emotion (EE) among families is a strong predictor of relapse for people with severe mental illness. Recent studies have also found the presence of EE in consumer–provider relationships. Despite high consistency in the findings related to EE and relapse, the concept has weak validity as little is known about how exactly it triggers relapse. Microsociological theory provides a framework with which to analyze social interaction and, more specifically, understand how interactions relate to the emotions of pride and shame. By identifying the components of interaction rituals, the theory provides insight into the key processes underlying EE and demonstrates how methodologies based on direct observation have the potential to measure EE with greater validity. This article describes how microsociological theory can be applied to the concept of EE.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2007

References

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