Bridging Healthcare, Police, and Court Responses to Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrated by Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Bridging Healthcare, Police, and Court Responses to Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrated by... A subgroup of individuals with severe and presistent mental illness (SPMI) commit acts of intimate partner violence (IPV). State and federal legislators have enacted statutes altering police response to IPV. Proarrest laws have curbed police discretion to a degree, and resulted in more IPV arrests. Unaware of alternative options, such as family court, mental health professionals may refer families with IPV to the police. However, perpetrators with SPMI may be inappropriate for adjudication in the criminal justice system. A singular legal response to IPV may miss the opportunity for detection and assertive treatment of SPMI, that could promote safety and reduce the likelihood of violence. Offenders with SPMI may also have difficulty comprehending court procedures. This article discusses the potential for a more flexible approach to IPV through interdisciplinary coordination and training of police, judges, attorneys, legal advocates, mental health professionals and substance abuse providers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Bridging Healthcare, Police, and Court Responses to Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrated by Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:PSAQ.0000019755.33408.83
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A subgroup of individuals with severe and presistent mental illness (SPMI) commit acts of intimate partner violence (IPV). State and federal legislators have enacted statutes altering police response to IPV. Proarrest laws have curbed police discretion to a degree, and resulted in more IPV arrests. Unaware of alternative options, such as family court, mental health professionals may refer families with IPV to the police. However, perpetrators with SPMI may be inappropriate for adjudication in the criminal justice system. A singular legal response to IPV may miss the opportunity for detection and assertive treatment of SPMI, that could promote safety and reduce the likelihood of violence. Offenders with SPMI may also have difficulty comprehending court procedures. This article discusses the potential for a more flexible approach to IPV through interdisciplinary coordination and training of police, judges, attorneys, legal advocates, mental health professionals and substance abuse providers.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2004

References

  • Risk factors for male-to-female partner physical abuse
    Schumacher, JA; Feldbau-Kohn, S; Smith Slep, AM

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