Breeding-migration patterns and reproductive dynamics of two syntopic newt species (Amphibia, Salamandridae) at a temporary pond in southern Greece

Breeding-migration patterns and reproductive dynamics of two syntopic newt species (Amphibia,... Amphibian breeding-migrations are strongly influenced by environmental conditions. Furthermore, an individual’s breeding-migration pattern might be influenced by their sex, size, physiological state, and/or fecundity. From 2012 to 2014, we collected mark–recapture data for two syntopic alpine (Ichthyosaura alpestris) and smooth (Lissotriton vulgaris) newt populations in southern Greece (the southern limit of their distribution), as well as morphometric data for individuals, and data on environmental factors. Using these data, we studied the reproductive dynamics of these populations and assessed whether individual traits and environmental covariates influence their breeding-migration patterns. Both species followed a similar temporal migration pattern, regardless of individual traits. Migration to the breeding site was influenced by water availability, but not by ground temperature, rainfall or photoperiod. Migration from the breeding site was not influenced by water availability, but was triggered by increasing water temperatures. Our findings corroborate the few available studies of European newt populations occurring near the southern edge of their distribution. However, compared to numerous studies of northern European newt populations, our results suggest distinct breeding-migration patterns, as well as contrasting effects of environmental factors on these migration patterns. Based on current climate change projections, the breeding period of southern newt populations breeding in temporary ponds could be severely reduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hydrobiologia Springer Journals

Breeding-migration patterns and reproductive dynamics of two syntopic newt species (Amphibia, Salamandridae) at a temporary pond in southern Greece

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/breeding-migration-patterns-and-reproductive-dynamics-of-two-syntopic-CKo9nrWvSd
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0018-8158
eISSN
1573-5117
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10750-018-3577-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Amphibian breeding-migrations are strongly influenced by environmental conditions. Furthermore, an individual’s breeding-migration pattern might be influenced by their sex, size, physiological state, and/or fecundity. From 2012 to 2014, we collected mark–recapture data for two syntopic alpine (Ichthyosaura alpestris) and smooth (Lissotriton vulgaris) newt populations in southern Greece (the southern limit of their distribution), as well as morphometric data for individuals, and data on environmental factors. Using these data, we studied the reproductive dynamics of these populations and assessed whether individual traits and environmental covariates influence their breeding-migration patterns. Both species followed a similar temporal migration pattern, regardless of individual traits. Migration to the breeding site was influenced by water availability, but not by ground temperature, rainfall or photoperiod. Migration from the breeding site was not influenced by water availability, but was triggered by increasing water temperatures. Our findings corroborate the few available studies of European newt populations occurring near the southern edge of their distribution. However, compared to numerous studies of northern European newt populations, our results suggest distinct breeding-migration patterns, as well as contrasting effects of environmental factors on these migration patterns. Based on current climate change projections, the breeding period of southern newt populations breeding in temporary ponds could be severely reduced.

Journal

HydrobiologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off