Botulinum Toxins Inhibit the Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH)-Stimulated Increase in Rabbit Cortical Collecting-Tubule Water Permeability

Botulinum Toxins Inhibit the Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH)-Stimulated Increase in Rabbit Cortical... The mammalian renal collecting duct increases its water permeability in response to antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH causes cytoplasmic endosomes containing the water channel, aquaporin 2 (AQP2), to fuse with the apical membrane so that the water permeability of the tubule increases many times above baseline. SNARE proteins are involved in the docking and fusion of vesicles with the cell membrane in neuron synapses. Whether these proteins are involved in the fusion of vesicles to the cell membrane in other tissues is not entirely clear. In the present study, we examined the role of SNARE proteins in the insertion of water channels in the collecting-duct response to ADH by using botulinum toxins A, B and C. Toxins isolated from clostridium botulinum are specific proteases that cleave different SNARE proteins and inactivate them. Tubules were perfused in vitro with botulinum toxin in the perfusate (50 nM for A and B and 15 nM for C). ADH (200 pM) was then added to the bath after baseline measurements of osmotic water permeability (P f) and the change in P f was followed for one hour. Botulinum toxins significantly inhibited the maximum P f by approximately 50%. Botulinum toxins A and C also decreased the rate of rise of P f. Thus, SNARE proteins are involved in the insertion of the water channels in the collecting duct. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Botulinum Toxins Inhibit the Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH)-Stimulated Increase in Rabbit Cortical Collecting-Tubule Water Permeability

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/botulinum-toxins-inhibit-the-antidiuretic-hormone-adh-stimulated-UM8Hx97vGa
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Human Physiology; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-005-0754-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The mammalian renal collecting duct increases its water permeability in response to antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH causes cytoplasmic endosomes containing the water channel, aquaporin 2 (AQP2), to fuse with the apical membrane so that the water permeability of the tubule increases many times above baseline. SNARE proteins are involved in the docking and fusion of vesicles with the cell membrane in neuron synapses. Whether these proteins are involved in the fusion of vesicles to the cell membrane in other tissues is not entirely clear. In the present study, we examined the role of SNARE proteins in the insertion of water channels in the collecting-duct response to ADH by using botulinum toxins A, B and C. Toxins isolated from clostridium botulinum are specific proteases that cleave different SNARE proteins and inactivate them. Tubules were perfused in vitro with botulinum toxin in the perfusate (50 nM for A and B and 15 nM for C). ADH (200 pM) was then added to the bath after baseline measurements of osmotic water permeability (P f) and the change in P f was followed for one hour. Botulinum toxins significantly inhibited the maximum P f by approximately 50%. Botulinum toxins A and C also decreased the rate of rise of P f. Thus, SNARE proteins are involved in the insertion of the water channels in the collecting duct.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off