Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Depression: Theoretical Considerations and Treatment Strategies

Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Depression: Theoretical Considerations and Treatment Strategies Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), also known as dysmorphophobia, consists of a distressing and impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance. BDD is an underrecognized and relatively common disorder that is associated with high rates of occupational and social impairment, hospitalization, and suicide attempts. BDD is unlikely to simply be a symptom of depression, although it often coexists with depression and may be related to depression. It is important to recognize BDD in depressed patients, because missing the diagnosis can result in refractory BDD and depressive symptoms. Available data indicate that BDD may not respond to all treatments for depression and may instead respond preferentially to serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. In addition, lengthier treatment trials than those required for depression may be needed to successfully treat BDD and comorbid depression. It can be difficult and challenging to diagnose BDD in depressed patients because the symptoms are often concealed due to embarrassment and shame. This paper discusses the relationship between BDD and depression and discusses practical strategies for recognizing and treating BDD and depressive symptoms in patients with depression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Depression: Theoretical Considerations and Treatment Strategies

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1022090200057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), also known as dysmorphophobia, consists of a distressing and impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance. BDD is an underrecognized and relatively common disorder that is associated with high rates of occupational and social impairment, hospitalization, and suicide attempts. BDD is unlikely to simply be a symptom of depression, although it often coexists with depression and may be related to depression. It is important to recognize BDD in depressed patients, because missing the diagnosis can result in refractory BDD and depressive symptoms. Available data indicate that BDD may not respond to all treatments for depression and may instead respond preferentially to serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. In addition, lengthier treatment trials than those required for depression may be needed to successfully treat BDD and comorbid depression. It can be difficult and challenging to diagnose BDD in depressed patients because the symptoms are often concealed due to embarrassment and shame. This paper discusses the relationship between BDD and depression and discusses practical strategies for recognizing and treating BDD and depressive symptoms in patients with depression.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

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