Biophysical response of young pomegranate trees to surface and sub-surface drip irrigation and deficit irrigation

Biophysical response of young pomegranate trees to surface and sub-surface drip irrigation and... Due to recurring agricultural water shortages, many farmers are looking for crops such as pomegranate that have both some degree of drought resistance and a higher economic value. To manage limited water effectively, it is necessary to know how pomegranate trees respond to varying levels of applied water and the type of irrigation system used. This study was conducted in experimental orchards located at the University of California Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension (UC KARE) Center and the USDA-ARS San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center in Parlier, California. The impact of surface drip (DI) and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) at the UC KARE orchard and irrigation levels (35, 50, 75, 100% of crop water use) at the USDA-ARS orchard on tree canopy size [fractional canopy ground cover (f c), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), normalized difference infrared index (NDII)], canopy-to-air temperature difference, and fruit yield was determined during the 2012–2014 growing seasons. There was no difference in tree canopy size between the DI and SDI systems at the UC KARE site; but trees under SDI produced larger fruit in 2013 and higher yield whilst saving about 10% of water application. The difference in water application highlights an advantage of SDI over DI systems to conserve water without creating negative impacts on tree size or yield. At the USDA-ARS site, the 35 and 50% irrigation treatments significantly reduced tree canopy size in 2013 and 2014, compared to the 75 and 100% irrigation treatments. In 2014, trees irrigated with 75% of crop water use produced more yield than trees irrigated at 35% of crop water use. Furthermore, NDVI and NDII were correlated to f c. The relationships between NDVI to f c and f c to pomegranate crop coefficient were established. The derived crop coefficient from ground-based remotely sensed data may potentially be used as a tool by farmers and water managers to estimate pomegranate tree water use on a field or regional scale using aerial or satellite imagery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Irrigation Science Springer Journals

Biophysical response of young pomegranate trees to surface and sub-surface drip irrigation and deficit irrigation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/biophysical-response-of-young-pomegranate-trees-to-surface-and-sub-3p6qtWUDqR
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany (outside the USA)
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Water Industry/Water Technologies; Environment, general; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution; Sustainable Development; Climate Change
ISSN
0342-7188
eISSN
1432-1319
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00271-017-0551-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Due to recurring agricultural water shortages, many farmers are looking for crops such as pomegranate that have both some degree of drought resistance and a higher economic value. To manage limited water effectively, it is necessary to know how pomegranate trees respond to varying levels of applied water and the type of irrigation system used. This study was conducted in experimental orchards located at the University of California Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension (UC KARE) Center and the USDA-ARS San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center in Parlier, California. The impact of surface drip (DI) and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) at the UC KARE orchard and irrigation levels (35, 50, 75, 100% of crop water use) at the USDA-ARS orchard on tree canopy size [fractional canopy ground cover (f c), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), normalized difference infrared index (NDII)], canopy-to-air temperature difference, and fruit yield was determined during the 2012–2014 growing seasons. There was no difference in tree canopy size between the DI and SDI systems at the UC KARE site; but trees under SDI produced larger fruit in 2013 and higher yield whilst saving about 10% of water application. The difference in water application highlights an advantage of SDI over DI systems to conserve water without creating negative impacts on tree size or yield. At the USDA-ARS site, the 35 and 50% irrigation treatments significantly reduced tree canopy size in 2013 and 2014, compared to the 75 and 100% irrigation treatments. In 2014, trees irrigated with 75% of crop water use produced more yield than trees irrigated at 35% of crop water use. Furthermore, NDVI and NDII were correlated to f c. The relationships between NDVI to f c and f c to pomegranate crop coefficient were established. The derived crop coefficient from ground-based remotely sensed data may potentially be used as a tool by farmers and water managers to estimate pomegranate tree water use on a field or regional scale using aerial or satellite imagery.

Journal

Irrigation ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 6, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off