Biological Responses to Disasters

Biological Responses to Disasters The pathogenic effect of extreme events has been equated with their immediate stressfulness, and thereby with the biology of stress. This article extends this classical view to include, among other pathogenic factors the biological dimensions of learning, social interaction, territorial behavior, and a top-down brain process that links personal and cultural meanings with emotional and bodily responses. The paper depicts the way in which mechanisms related to stress and aversive learning trigger an initial response and those related to separation, loss and sensitization shape its long-term consequences. Traumatic events are followed by a critical period of increased brain plasticity, during which irreversible neuronal changes may occur in those who develop traumatic stress disorders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Biological Responses to Disasters

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1004686211979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The pathogenic effect of extreme events has been equated with their immediate stressfulness, and thereby with the biology of stress. This article extends this classical view to include, among other pathogenic factors the biological dimensions of learning, social interaction, territorial behavior, and a top-down brain process that links personal and cultural meanings with emotional and bodily responses. The paper depicts the way in which mechanisms related to stress and aversive learning trigger an initial response and those related to separation, loss and sensitization shape its long-term consequences. Traumatic events are followed by a critical period of increased brain plasticity, during which irreversible neuronal changes may occur in those who develop traumatic stress disorders.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 9, 2004

References

  • Noradrenergic and dopaminergic interactions in escape behavior: analysis of uncontrollable stress effects
    Anisman, H; Ritch, M; Sklar, LS
  • Time-dependent sensitization as the cornerstone for a new approach to pharmacotherapy: drugs as foreign/stressful stimuli
    Antelman, SM

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