Biogas production from different lignocellulosic biomass sources: advances and perspectives

Biogas production from different lignocellulosic biomass sources: advances and perspectives The present work summarizes different sources of biomass used as raw material for the production of biogas, focusing mainly on the use of plants that do not compete with the food supply. Biogas obtained from edible plants entails a developed technology and good yield of methane production; however, its use may not be sustainable. Biomass from agricultural waste is a cheap option, but in general, with lower methane yields than those obtained from edible plants. On the other hand, the use of algae or aquatic plants promises to be an efficient and sustainable option with high yields of methane produced, but it necessary to overcome the existing technological barriers. Moreover, these last raw materials have the additional advantage that they can be obtained from wastewater treatment and, therefore, they could be applied to the concept of biorefinery. An estimation of methane yield per hectare per year of the some types of biomass and operational conditions employed is presented as well. In addition, different strategies to improve the yield of biogas, such as physical, chemical, and biological pretreatments, are presented. Other alternatives for enhanced the biogas production such as bioaugmentation and biohythane are showed and finally perspectives are mentioned. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 3 Biotech Springer Journals

Biogas production from different lignocellulosic biomass sources: advances and perspectives

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Biotechnology; Agriculture; Cancer Research; Bioinformatics; Stem Cells; Biomaterials
ISSN
2190-572X
eISSN
2190-5738
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13205-018-1257-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present work summarizes different sources of biomass used as raw material for the production of biogas, focusing mainly on the use of plants that do not compete with the food supply. Biogas obtained from edible plants entails a developed technology and good yield of methane production; however, its use may not be sustainable. Biomass from agricultural waste is a cheap option, but in general, with lower methane yields than those obtained from edible plants. On the other hand, the use of algae or aquatic plants promises to be an efficient and sustainable option with high yields of methane produced, but it necessary to overcome the existing technological barriers. Moreover, these last raw materials have the additional advantage that they can be obtained from wastewater treatment and, therefore, they could be applied to the concept of biorefinery. An estimation of methane yield per hectare per year of the some types of biomass and operational conditions employed is presented as well. In addition, different strategies to improve the yield of biogas, such as physical, chemical, and biological pretreatments, are presented. Other alternatives for enhanced the biogas production such as bioaugmentation and biohythane are showed and finally perspectives are mentioned.

Journal

3 BiotechSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 30, 2018

References

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