Biofortification of safflower: an oil seed crop engineered for ALA-targeting better sustainability and plant based omega-3 fatty acids

Biofortification of safflower: an oil seed crop engineered for ALA-targeting better... Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) deficiency and a skewed n6:n3 fatty acid ratio in the diet is a major explanation for the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. There is mounting evidence of the health benefits associated with omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA’s). Although present in abundance in fish, a number of factors limit our consumption of fish based omega-3 PUFA’s. To name a few, overexploitation of wild fish stocks has reduced their sustainability due to increased demand of aquaculture for fish oil and meal; the pollution of marine food webs has raised concerns over the ingestion of toxic substances such as heavy metals and dioxins; vegetarians do not consider fish-based sources for supplemental nutrition. Thus alternative sources are being sought and one approach to the sustainable supply of LC-PUFAs is the metabolic engineering of transgenic plants with the capacity to synthesize n3 LC-PUFAs. The present investigation was carried out with the goal of developing transgenic safflower capable of producing pharmaceutically important alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3, n3). This crop was selected as the seeds accumulate ~ 78% of the total fatty acids as linoleic acid (LA, C18:2, n6), the immediate precursor of ALA. In the present work, ALA production was achieved successfully in safflower seeds by transforming safflower hypocotyls with Arabidopsis specific delta 15 desaturase (FAD3) driven by truncated seed specific promoter. Transgenic safflower fortified with ALA is not only potentially valuable nutritional superior novel oil but also has reduced ratio of LA to ALA which is required for good health. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transgenic Research Springer Journals

Biofortification of safflower: an oil seed crop engineered for ALA-targeting better sustainability and plant based omega-3 fatty acids

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Plant Genetics and Genomics; Transgenics; Biomedical Engineering/Biotechnology; Genetic Engineering; Molecular Medicine
ISSN
0962-8819
eISSN
1573-9368
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11248-018-0070-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) deficiency and a skewed n6:n3 fatty acid ratio in the diet is a major explanation for the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. There is mounting evidence of the health benefits associated with omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA’s). Although present in abundance in fish, a number of factors limit our consumption of fish based omega-3 PUFA’s. To name a few, overexploitation of wild fish stocks has reduced their sustainability due to increased demand of aquaculture for fish oil and meal; the pollution of marine food webs has raised concerns over the ingestion of toxic substances such as heavy metals and dioxins; vegetarians do not consider fish-based sources for supplemental nutrition. Thus alternative sources are being sought and one approach to the sustainable supply of LC-PUFAs is the metabolic engineering of transgenic plants with the capacity to synthesize n3 LC-PUFAs. The present investigation was carried out with the goal of developing transgenic safflower capable of producing pharmaceutically important alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3, n3). This crop was selected as the seeds accumulate ~ 78% of the total fatty acids as linoleic acid (LA, C18:2, n6), the immediate precursor of ALA. In the present work, ALA production was achieved successfully in safflower seeds by transforming safflower hypocotyls with Arabidopsis specific delta 15 desaturase (FAD3) driven by truncated seed specific promoter. Transgenic safflower fortified with ALA is not only potentially valuable nutritional superior novel oil but also has reduced ratio of LA to ALA which is required for good health.

Journal

Transgenic ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 11, 2018

References

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