Bioassays on the role of tomato, potato and sweet pepper as sources of Tomato chlorosis virus transmitted by Bemisia tabaci MEAM1

Bioassays on the role of tomato, potato and sweet pepper as sources of Tomato chlorosis virus... Tomato chlorosis virus, transmitted by Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 in a semipersistent manner, is widely spread in solanaceous producing region in Brazil, as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), potato (S. tuberosum) and sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum). The interactions between tomato, potato and sweet pepper in the virus acquisition and transmission processes by the vector were studied. ToCV-infected potato and tomato plants were used as sources of inoculum for the vector, which subsequently transmitted the virus to tomato, potato, and sweet pepper plants in choice tests of inoculated species. For no choice tests, having tomato as the source of inoculum, ToCV transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 53.3%, 50%, and 16.6%, respectively. When ToCV-infected potato was the source of inoculum, the transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 30%, 46.6 and 3.3%, respectively. In the trials with free-choice and ToCV-infected tomato as the source of inoculum, virus transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 50%, 35 and 0%, respectively. With ToCV-infected potato as source of inoculum, transmission rates were 25%, 10 and 0% for tomato, potato and sweet pepper, respectively. When viruliferous insects were used in trials with free-choice for the vector, transmission rates were 40%, 45 and 0% for tomato, potato and sweet pepper, respectively. Based on statistical analysis using the logistic regression model, tomato was the best source of inoculum, while sweet pepper was the least susceptible to infection and less preferred by whiteflies than the other Solanaceae species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plant Pathology Springer Journals

Bioassays on the role of tomato, potato and sweet pepper as sources of Tomato chlorosis virus transmitted by Bemisia tabaci MEAM1

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Koninklijke Nederlandse Planteziektenkundige Vereniging
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Plant Sciences; Ecology; Agriculture; Life Sciences, general
ISSN
0929-1873
eISSN
1573-8469
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10658-018-1504-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tomato chlorosis virus, transmitted by Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 in a semipersistent manner, is widely spread in solanaceous producing region in Brazil, as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), potato (S. tuberosum) and sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum). The interactions between tomato, potato and sweet pepper in the virus acquisition and transmission processes by the vector were studied. ToCV-infected potato and tomato plants were used as sources of inoculum for the vector, which subsequently transmitted the virus to tomato, potato, and sweet pepper plants in choice tests of inoculated species. For no choice tests, having tomato as the source of inoculum, ToCV transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 53.3%, 50%, and 16.6%, respectively. When ToCV-infected potato was the source of inoculum, the transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 30%, 46.6 and 3.3%, respectively. In the trials with free-choice and ToCV-infected tomato as the source of inoculum, virus transmission rates for tomato, potato and sweet pepper were 50%, 35 and 0%, respectively. With ToCV-infected potato as source of inoculum, transmission rates were 25%, 10 and 0% for tomato, potato and sweet pepper, respectively. When viruliferous insects were used in trials with free-choice for the vector, transmission rates were 40%, 45 and 0% for tomato, potato and sweet pepper, respectively. Based on statistical analysis using the logistic regression model, tomato was the best source of inoculum, while sweet pepper was the least susceptible to infection and less preferred by whiteflies than the other Solanaceae species.

Journal

European Journal of Plant PathologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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