Binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses for free flap surgery: a reliable method for developing countries

Binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses for free flap surgery: a reliable method for... Although free flaps are gaining more popularity, the logistic reasons and slow training curve are still major obstacles, particularly in developing countries. Binocular magnification glasses seemed an appealing alternative to surgical microscopes and loupes. From May 2008 to December 2010, 16 gracilis free flaps were performed by five surgeons using binocular-magnifying eye glass in the Plastic Surgery Unit of Suez Canal University Hospital. Survival rate of the flaps was 100%. Only two patients (one smoker and one diabetic) had complications: partial flap loss with infection and hematoma. Both were treated conservatively. The main advantages of this magnification method were very low cost, availability, and short training period compared with a standard microsurgery training. Other advantages were the freedom of movement during operation, same orientation, wide field, adjustability of working distance, and permission of team work. The only inconvenience was the restriction of working distance, although longer or similar to that of loupes. We therefore recommend the use of this method in developing countries as well as relief and war field hospitals. Furthermore, these glasses seem to be of value in all surgeries needing magnification. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses for free flap surgery: a reliable method for developing countries

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00238-011-0675-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although free flaps are gaining more popularity, the logistic reasons and slow training curve are still major obstacles, particularly in developing countries. Binocular magnification glasses seemed an appealing alternative to surgical microscopes and loupes. From May 2008 to December 2010, 16 gracilis free flaps were performed by five surgeons using binocular-magnifying eye glass in the Plastic Surgery Unit of Suez Canal University Hospital. Survival rate of the flaps was 100%. Only two patients (one smoker and one diabetic) had complications: partial flap loss with infection and hematoma. Both were treated conservatively. The main advantages of this magnification method were very low cost, availability, and short training period compared with a standard microsurgery training. Other advantages were the freedom of movement during operation, same orientation, wide field, adjustability of working distance, and permission of team work. The only inconvenience was the restriction of working distance, although longer or similar to that of loupes. We therefore recommend the use of this method in developing countries as well as relief and war field hospitals. Furthermore, these glasses seem to be of value in all surgeries needing magnification.

Journal

European Journal of Plastic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2012

References

  • Reconstruction of large head and neck deformities: experience with free gracilis muscle and myocutanous flaps
    Frari, B; Schoeller, T; Wechselberger, G
  • Gracilis muscle flap for aesthetic reconstruction in the head and neck region
    Huemer, G; Bauer, T; Wechselberger, G; Schoeller, T

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