Benevolent Sexism, Men’s Advantages and the Prescription of Warmth to Women

Benevolent Sexism, Men’s Advantages and the Prescription of Warmth to Women Gender prescriptions consist of beliefs about the characteristics that men and women should possess. This paper focuses on stereotypic prescriptions targeting women and on some of the variables that influence the adherence to these prescriptions. In Study 1, male undergraduates (N = 36) from Belgium completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI—Glick and Fiske 1996), questions assessing the prescription of warmth- and competence-related traits to a female target and a measure of the target’s perceived status. In Study 2, male undergraduates (N = 80) from Belgium completed a questionnaire assessing the perceived benefit associated with warmth traits possessed by women, in either a family or a professional context, a prescription measure regarding these traits and finally the ASI. Study 1 indicated that the prescription of warmth to women depends upon their perceived status. Study 2 showed that men are more prone to seeing the benefit to be gained for themselves from women’s warmth and to prescribe it more so in a family context than in a professional one. Both studies also showed that men’s endorsement of benevolent sexism is related to women’s perceived status / the perception of a benefit for men to be gained from women’s warmth and, consequently, to the prescription of warmth traits to women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Benevolent Sexism, Men’s Advantages and the Prescription of Warmth to Women

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-012-0232-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gender prescriptions consist of beliefs about the characteristics that men and women should possess. This paper focuses on stereotypic prescriptions targeting women and on some of the variables that influence the adherence to these prescriptions. In Study 1, male undergraduates (N = 36) from Belgium completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI—Glick and Fiske 1996), questions assessing the prescription of warmth- and competence-related traits to a female target and a measure of the target’s perceived status. In Study 2, male undergraduates (N = 80) from Belgium completed a questionnaire assessing the perceived benefit associated with warmth traits possessed by women, in either a family or a professional context, a prescription measure regarding these traits and finally the ASI. Study 1 indicated that the prescription of warmth to women depends upon their perceived status. Study 2 showed that men are more prone to seeing the benefit to be gained for themselves from women’s warmth and to prescribe it more so in a family context than in a professional one. Both studies also showed that men’s endorsement of benevolent sexism is related to women’s perceived status / the perception of a benefit for men to be gained from women’s warmth and, consequently, to the prescription of warmth traits to women.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 25, 2012

References

  • Gender, hierarchy and leadership: An introduction
    Carli, LL; Eagly, AH
  • Stereotype content model across cultures: Towards universal similarities and some differences
    Cuddy, AJC; Fiske, ST; Kwan, VSY; Glick, P; Demoulin, S; Leyens, J-P
  • Is traditional gender ideology associated with sex-typed mate preferences? A test in nine nations
    Eastwick, PW; Eagly, AH; Glick, P; Johannesen-Schmidt, MC; Fiske, ST; Blum, AM
  • (Dis)respecting versus (dis)liking: Status and interdependence predict ambivalent stereotypes of competence and warmth
    Fiske, ST; Xu, J; Cuddy, AC; Glick, P
  • Perceptions of the woman who breastfeeds: The role of erotophobia, sexism, and attitudinal variables
    Forbes, GB; Adams-Curtis, LE; Hamm, NR; White, KB
  • Association of the thin body ideal, ambivalent sexism, and self-esteem with body acceptance and the preferred body size of college women in Poland and the United States
    Forbes, GB; Doroszerwicz, K; Card, K; Adams-Curtis, L
  • Prejudice against women in male-congenial environments: Perceptions of gender role congruity in leadership
    Garcia-Retamero, R; Lopez-Zafra, E

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