Behavioral Rehabilitation and the Reduction of Aggressive and Self-Injurious Behaviors with Cognitively Impaired, Chronic Psychiatric Inpatients

Behavioral Rehabilitation and the Reduction of Aggressive and Self-Injurious Behaviors with... Aggressive behavior has been identified as a significant concern and occupational hazard in psychiatric inpatient settings. Several factors, including lax or unclear ward structure, have been identified as contributing to the exhibition of aggressive behavior. Token economies are effective in increasing ward structure and reducing aggressive behavior. This study evaluated the effects of rehabilitation programming, based on Gordon Paul's social learning approach (SLA), on rates of aggressive and self-injurious behaviors in a group of cognitively impaired, chronic psychiatric inpatients, compared to three long-term wards of similar patients. While no differences were found between the two groups prior to implementing SLA procedures, lower rates of aggression and self-injurious behavior were observed at one and two years on the Paul-derived ward. These results support the use of Paul's approach with multiply-impaired psychiatric inpatients in reducing patient aggression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Behavioral Rehabilitation and the Reduction of Aggressive and Self-Injurious Behaviors with Cognitively Impaired, Chronic Psychiatric Inpatients

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1022075007384
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aggressive behavior has been identified as a significant concern and occupational hazard in psychiatric inpatient settings. Several factors, including lax or unclear ward structure, have been identified as contributing to the exhibition of aggressive behavior. Token economies are effective in increasing ward structure and reducing aggressive behavior. This study evaluated the effects of rehabilitation programming, based on Gordon Paul's social learning approach (SLA), on rates of aggressive and self-injurious behaviors in a group of cognitively impaired, chronic psychiatric inpatients, compared to three long-term wards of similar patients. While no differences were found between the two groups prior to implementing SLA procedures, lower rates of aggression and self-injurious behavior were observed at one and two years on the Paul-derived ward. These results support the use of Paul's approach with multiply-impaired psychiatric inpatients in reducing patient aggression.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

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