Basic Types of Structural Changes in the Leaf Mesophyll during Adaptation of Eastern Pamir Plants to Mountain Conditions

Basic Types of Structural Changes in the Leaf Mesophyll during Adaptation of Eastern Pamir Plants... Quantitative characteristics of mesophyll structure were compared in leaves of eleven alpine plant species grown under natural conditions in the Eastern Pamirs at various altitudes, from 3800 to 4750 m. Basic types of changes in mesophyll structure, associated with plant adaptation to mountain conditions, were characterized. These changes manifested themselves in different numbers of cell layers and cell sizes in the palisade tissue and, as a consequence, in changed leaf thickness and cell number per unit of leaf area. Three plant groups were identified by the changes in the leaf structural characteristics depending on the type of mesophyll structure, ecological group of plant species, and altitude of plant habitat. The first group comprised alpine xerophytes with an isopalisade structure, in which the volume of palisade cells decreased and their number per unit of leaf area increased with the altitude of plant habitat. The number of mesophyll layers and leaf thickness decreased or did not change with altitude. The second group comprised subalpine plant species with a dorsoventral structure of mesophyll; these species occur below the line of continuous night frost. In these plant species, the number of mesophyll layers, leaf thickness, and cell number per unit of leaf area increased with altitude. The third group comprised mesophyte plants with a dorsoventral and homogenous mesophyll structure, which are encountered in a wide range of habitats, including the nival belt (from 4700 to 5000 m). In this group, cell volume increased and cell number per unit of leaf area decreased with altitude. We present a general scheme of leaf structural changes, which explains the changes in the quantitative characteristics of mesophyll as a function of altitude and highland environmental conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Basic Types of Structural Changes in the Leaf Mesophyll during Adaptation of Eastern Pamir Plants to Mountain Conditions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/basic-types-of-structural-changes-in-the-leaf-mesophyll-during-z9CDNeOqjg
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1021976132165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quantitative characteristics of mesophyll structure were compared in leaves of eleven alpine plant species grown under natural conditions in the Eastern Pamirs at various altitudes, from 3800 to 4750 m. Basic types of changes in mesophyll structure, associated with plant adaptation to mountain conditions, were characterized. These changes manifested themselves in different numbers of cell layers and cell sizes in the palisade tissue and, as a consequence, in changed leaf thickness and cell number per unit of leaf area. Three plant groups were identified by the changes in the leaf structural characteristics depending on the type of mesophyll structure, ecological group of plant species, and altitude of plant habitat. The first group comprised alpine xerophytes with an isopalisade structure, in which the volume of palisade cells decreased and their number per unit of leaf area increased with the altitude of plant habitat. The number of mesophyll layers and leaf thickness decreased or did not change with altitude. The second group comprised subalpine plant species with a dorsoventral structure of mesophyll; these species occur below the line of continuous night frost. In these plant species, the number of mesophyll layers, leaf thickness, and cell number per unit of leaf area increased with altitude. The third group comprised mesophyte plants with a dorsoventral and homogenous mesophyll structure, which are encountered in a wide range of habitats, including the nival belt (from 4700 to 5000 m). In this group, cell volume increased and cell number per unit of leaf area decreased with altitude. We present a general scheme of leaf structural changes, which explains the changes in the quantitative characteristics of mesophyll as a function of altitude and highland environmental conditions.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off