Barcode index numbers expedite quarantine inspections and aid the interception of nonindigenous mealybugs (Pseudococcidae)

Barcode index numbers expedite quarantine inspections and aid the interception of nonindigenous... Quarantine interception of invasive and nonindigenous insect pests at ports of entry is often impeded by the lack of robust identification methods. Because of their inconspicuous morphology and wax-covered bodies, mealybugs present a particular challenge. The present study employs DNA barcoding (658 base pairs near the 5′-terminus of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene) as a tool for their discrimination because of its proven utility in discriminating closely related species. The current study considers DNA barcodes from 914 mealybugs (Pseudococcidae) collected in 31 countries. Most (836) of these specimens were assigned to a named species, but others were only identified to a genus or family. Their sequence analysis revealed substantial COI diversity with maximum divergences reaching 27%. While the identified specimens included representatives of 62 species, the Barcode Index Number (BIN) system assigned the 914 sequences to 120 BINs, nearly doubling the putative species count and revealing cases of potential cryptic species and misidentifications. With a single exception, intraspecific divergence values for named species were less than their nearest-neighbor distances, but 13 species showed BIN splits and two species were merged in a BIN. High genetic diversity and presence of cryptic species in the known mealybugs, revealed in this study, underscore the limitations of morphology and potential utility of BINs for the rapid recognition of nonindigenous insect pests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Barcode index numbers expedite quarantine inspections and aid the interception of nonindigenous mealybugs (Pseudococcidae)

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10530-017-1546-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quarantine interception of invasive and nonindigenous insect pests at ports of entry is often impeded by the lack of robust identification methods. Because of their inconspicuous morphology and wax-covered bodies, mealybugs present a particular challenge. The present study employs DNA barcoding (658 base pairs near the 5′-terminus of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene) as a tool for their discrimination because of its proven utility in discriminating closely related species. The current study considers DNA barcodes from 914 mealybugs (Pseudococcidae) collected in 31 countries. Most (836) of these specimens were assigned to a named species, but others were only identified to a genus or family. Their sequence analysis revealed substantial COI diversity with maximum divergences reaching 27%. While the identified specimens included representatives of 62 species, the Barcode Index Number (BIN) system assigned the 914 sequences to 120 BINs, nearly doubling the putative species count and revealing cases of potential cryptic species and misidentifications. With a single exception, intraspecific divergence values for named species were less than their nearest-neighbor distances, but 13 species showed BIN splits and two species were merged in a BIN. High genetic diversity and presence of cryptic species in the known mealybugs, revealed in this study, underscore the limitations of morphology and potential utility of BINs for the rapid recognition of nonindigenous insect pests.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2017

References

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