Bacteria enhanced lignocellulosic activated carbon for biofiltration of bisphenols in water

Bacteria enhanced lignocellulosic activated carbon for biofiltration of bisphenols in water There are eight bisphenol analogues being identified and characterized; among them, bisphenol A (BPA) is on the priority list on the basis of its higher level of uses, occurrence, and toxicity. The endocrine system interfered by BPA has been inventoried as it has the same function as the natural hormone 17β-estradiol and binds mainly to the estrogen receptor (ER) to exhibit estrogenic activities. The BPA concentration in surface waters (14–1390 ng/L) in many parts of the world, such as Japan, Korea, China, and India, was also a significant concern. Research efforts are focusing on restricting BPA consumption as well as removing BPA in our environment especially in drinking water. Current opinion is that lignocellulosic activated carbon stimulated with BPA- degrading bacteria could have the potential to provide solution for recent challenges faced by water utilities arising from BPA contamination in water. This technology has some new trends in the low-cost biofiltration process for removing BPA. This review is to provide in-depth discussion on the fate of BPA in our ecosystem and underlines methods to enhance the efficacy of activated carbon in the presence of BPA-degrading bacteria in the biofiltration process. Introduction surpassed 260 million tons per year globally (Barnes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Bacteria enhanced lignocellulosic activated carbon for biofiltration of bisphenols in water

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-2232-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are eight bisphenol analogues being identified and characterized; among them, bisphenol A (BPA) is on the priority list on the basis of its higher level of uses, occurrence, and toxicity. The endocrine system interfered by BPA has been inventoried as it has the same function as the natural hormone 17β-estradiol and binds mainly to the estrogen receptor (ER) to exhibit estrogenic activities. The BPA concentration in surface waters (14–1390 ng/L) in many parts of the world, such as Japan, Korea, China, and India, was also a significant concern. Research efforts are focusing on restricting BPA consumption as well as removing BPA in our environment especially in drinking water. Current opinion is that lignocellulosic activated carbon stimulated with BPA- degrading bacteria could have the potential to provide solution for recent challenges faced by water utilities arising from BPA contamination in water. This technology has some new trends in the low-cost biofiltration process for removing BPA. This review is to provide in-depth discussion on the fate of BPA in our ecosystem and underlines methods to enhance the efficacy of activated carbon in the presence of BPA-degrading bacteria in the biofiltration process. Introduction surpassed 260 million tons per year globally (Barnes

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

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