Autophony of eyelid movement is not independent of eyeball movement

Autophony of eyelid movement is not independent of eyeball movement European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (2018) 275:2607 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-018-5016-2 LE T TER TO  THE   EDITOR Autophony of eyelid movement is not independent of eyeball movement Mahmood F. Bhutta Received: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published online: 5 June 2018 © Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018 Bertholon et al. recently described characteristics of autoph- movement of the dura overlying the superior semicircular ony of eyeball or eyelid movement in six patients with supe- canal remains a valid and simple explanation [2]. rior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) syndrome [1]. Funding None. They confirm my observation that autophony of eye move- ments is specific to this syndrome [2 ], but also report the Compliance with ethical standards novel finding of autophony of eyelid movement, which also appears to be specific to this syndrome. Conflict of interest Author MB declares that he has no conflict of in- However, the authors fail to consider that eyelid move- terest. ment is not independent of eyeball movement. Several stud- ies [3–5] show that the eyeballs invariably rotate downwards Ethical approval This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors. and inwards with each blink, with this movement starting just before the blink is initiated [4]. In the cohort of patients described by Bertholon et al., the majority described both autophony of eyeball and References autophony of eyelid movement, but, admittedly, there were patients with only one of these symptoms. This could be 1. Bertholon P, Reynard P, Lelonge Y, Peyron R, Vassal F, Karkas A (2018) Hearing eyeball and/or eyelid movements on the side interpreted as signifying independent aetiology, but the par- of a unilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Eur Arch simonious explanation is that both these symptoms represent Otorhinolaryngol 275(2):629–635 differing manifestations of autophony of eyeball movement. 2. Bhutta MF (2015) Eye movement autophony in superior semicir- Perhaps those individuals who describe only autophony of cular canal dehiscence syndrome may be caused by trans-dural transmission of extraocular muscle contraction. Int J Audiol eyelid movements do so because the downward and inward 54(1):61–62 movement accompanying a blink is an otherwise unusual 3. Bour LJ, Aramideh M, de Visser BW (2000) Neurophysiological movement for the eyeball, and it is only when this specific aspects of eye and eyelid movements during blinking in humans. eyeball movement occurs that these patients experience the J Neurophysiol 83(1):166–176 4. Bergamin O, Bizzarri S, Straumann D (2002) Ocular torsion symptom. during voluntary blinks in humans. Investig Ophthalmol Vis Sci Bertholon et al. admit that autophony of eyeball and eye- 43(11):3438–3443 lid movement is difficult to explain. If, in fact, both these 5. Rambold H, Sprenger A, Helmchen C (2002) Effects of volun- symptoms relate to eyeball movement, then my theory of tary blinks on saccades, vergence eye movements, and saccade- vergence interactions in humans. J Neurophysiol 88(3):1220–1233 direct transmission of extraocular muscle contraction to This comment refers to the article available at https ://doi. org/10.1007/s0040 5-017-4781-7. * Mahmood F. Bhutta mahmood.bhutta@bsuh.nhs.uk Department of ENT, Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Eastern Road, Brighton BN2 5BE, UK Vol.:(0123456789) 1 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Springer Journals

Autophony of eyelid movement is not independent of eyeball movement

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/springer_journal/autophony-of-eyelid-movement-is-not-independent-of-eyeball-movement-BCipmWgZfG
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurosurgery; Head and Neck Surgery
ISSN
0937-4477
eISSN
1434-4726
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00405-018-5016-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (2018) 275:2607 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-018-5016-2 LE T TER TO  THE   EDITOR Autophony of eyelid movement is not independent of eyeball movement Mahmood F. Bhutta Received: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published online: 5 June 2018 © Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018 Bertholon et al. recently described characteristics of autoph- movement of the dura overlying the superior semicircular ony of eyeball or eyelid movement in six patients with supe- canal remains a valid and simple explanation [2]. rior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) syndrome [1]. Funding None. They confirm my observation that autophony of eye move- ments is specific to this syndrome [2 ], but also report the Compliance with ethical standards novel finding of autophony of eyelid movement, which also appears to be specific to this syndrome. Conflict of interest Author MB declares that he has no conflict of in- However, the authors fail to consider that eyelid move- terest. ment is not independent of eyeball movement. Several stud- ies [3–5] show that the eyeballs invariably rotate downwards Ethical approval This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors. and inwards with each blink, with this movement starting just before the blink is initiated [4]. In the cohort of patients described by Bertholon et al., the majority described both autophony of eyeball and References autophony of eyelid movement, but, admittedly, there were patients with only one of these symptoms. This could be 1. Bertholon P, Reynard P, Lelonge Y, Peyron R, Vassal F, Karkas A (2018) Hearing eyeball and/or eyelid movements on the side interpreted as signifying independent aetiology, but the par- of a unilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Eur Arch simonious explanation is that both these symptoms represent Otorhinolaryngol 275(2):629–635 differing manifestations of autophony of eyeball movement. 2. Bhutta MF (2015) Eye movement autophony in superior semicir- Perhaps those individuals who describe only autophony of cular canal dehiscence syndrome may be caused by trans-dural transmission of extraocular muscle contraction. Int J Audiol eyelid movements do so because the downward and inward 54(1):61–62 movement accompanying a blink is an otherwise unusual 3. Bour LJ, Aramideh M, de Visser BW (2000) Neurophysiological movement for the eyeball, and it is only when this specific aspects of eye and eyelid movements during blinking in humans. eyeball movement occurs that these patients experience the J Neurophysiol 83(1):166–176 4. Bergamin O, Bizzarri S, Straumann D (2002) Ocular torsion symptom. during voluntary blinks in humans. Investig Ophthalmol Vis Sci Bertholon et al. admit that autophony of eyeball and eye- 43(11):3438–3443 lid movement is difficult to explain. If, in fact, both these 5. Rambold H, Sprenger A, Helmchen C (2002) Effects of volun- symptoms relate to eyeball movement, then my theory of tary blinks on saccades, vergence eye movements, and saccade- vergence interactions in humans. J Neurophysiol 88(3):1220–1233 direct transmission of extraocular muscle contraction to This comment refers to the article available at https ://doi. org/10.1007/s0040 5-017-4781-7. * Mahmood F. Bhutta mahmood.bhutta@bsuh.nhs.uk Department of ENT, Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Eastern Road, Brighton BN2 5BE, UK Vol.:(0123456789) 1 3

Journal

European Archives of Oto-Rhino-LaryngologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off