Attitudes of Employed Women Toward Parents Who Choose Full-Time or Part-Time Employment Following Their Child's Birth

Attitudes of Employed Women Toward Parents Who Choose Full-Time or Part-Time Employment Following... Perceptions of married parents were examined as a function of their gender and their employment status following their child's birth. Women employed in hourly staff positions at a university (92% White, 8% African American, Asian American, or Hispanic American) evaluated a briefly described married employed parent on thirty-one 7-point bipolar scales that described nurturance behaviors, job performance characteristics, role overload variables, and personal adjustment characteristics. Each participant rated one of four parents portrayed as either a mother or a father who, following their child's birth, either continued to work full-time or reduced her/his work hours. Full-time employees were perceived as experiencing more stress and as being less family-oriented than reduced-hour employees. Mothers were viewed as better adjusted but as experiencing more stress than fathers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Attitudes of Employed Women Toward Parents Who Choose Full-Time or Part-Time Employment Following Their Child's Birth

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1012247226549
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Perceptions of married parents were examined as a function of their gender and their employment status following their child's birth. Women employed in hourly staff positions at a university (92% White, 8% African American, Asian American, or Hispanic American) evaluated a briefly described married employed parent on thirty-one 7-point bipolar scales that described nurturance behaviors, job performance characteristics, role overload variables, and personal adjustment characteristics. Each participant rated one of four parents portrayed as either a mother or a father who, following their child's birth, either continued to work full-time or reduced her/his work hours. Full-time employees were perceived as experiencing more stress and as being less family-oriented than reduced-hour employees. Mothers were viewed as better adjusted but as experiencing more stress than fathers.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

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