ATP6H, a subunit of vacuolar ATPase involved in metal transport: evaluation in canine copper toxicosis

ATP6H, a subunit of vacuolar ATPase involved in metal transport: evaluation in canine copper... Copper toxicosis (CT), resulting in liver disease, occurs commonly in Bedlington terriers. Canine CT is of particular interest because identification of the causative gene may lead to the discovery of another important gene in the copper transport pathway possibly related to human copper diseases not yet identified. Homologs of the copper transporting ATPase ATP7B, defective in Wilson disease, and the copper chaperone ATOX1 were potential candidates, but both have been excluded. The CT locus in Bedlington terriers has been mapped to canine chromosome region CFA10q26, which has a syntenic human chromosome region, HAS2p13-21. The gene ATP6H, for human vacuolar proton-ATPase subunit M9.2, is associated with copper and iron transport in yeast and has been mapped to HAS2p21 and suggested as a candidate gene for CT. We cloned canine ATP6H, which encodes a predicted protein with 99% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologous human protein. Canine ATP6H shows a conserved potential metal binding site, CSVCC, and a glycosylation site, NET. The canine ATP6H is organized into four exons, with a 246-bp open reading frame. Sequence analysis of the coding regions showed no mutations in ATP6H from genomic DNA of an affected dog. We have also identified two, apparently non-transcribed canine ATP6H pseudogenes. Mapping of the true ATP6H gene and a marker closely linked to the CT locus on a canine radiation hybrid panel indicted lack of close physical association. We have therefore excluded canine ATP6H as a candidate gene for canine copper toxicosis, indicating that some other unidentified gene is responsible for this copper storage disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

ATP6H, a subunit of vacuolar ATPase involved in metal transport: evaluation in canine copper toxicosis

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Anatomy; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-001-2059-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Copper toxicosis (CT), resulting in liver disease, occurs commonly in Bedlington terriers. Canine CT is of particular interest because identification of the causative gene may lead to the discovery of another important gene in the copper transport pathway possibly related to human copper diseases not yet identified. Homologs of the copper transporting ATPase ATP7B, defective in Wilson disease, and the copper chaperone ATOX1 were potential candidates, but both have been excluded. The CT locus in Bedlington terriers has been mapped to canine chromosome region CFA10q26, which has a syntenic human chromosome region, HAS2p13-21. The gene ATP6H, for human vacuolar proton-ATPase subunit M9.2, is associated with copper and iron transport in yeast and has been mapped to HAS2p21 and suggested as a candidate gene for CT. We cloned canine ATP6H, which encodes a predicted protein with 99% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologous human protein. Canine ATP6H shows a conserved potential metal binding site, CSVCC, and a glycosylation site, NET. The canine ATP6H is organized into four exons, with a 246-bp open reading frame. Sequence analysis of the coding regions showed no mutations in ATP6H from genomic DNA of an affected dog. We have also identified two, apparently non-transcribed canine ATP6H pseudogenes. Mapping of the true ATP6H gene and a marker closely linked to the CT locus on a canine radiation hybrid panel indicted lack of close physical association. We have therefore excluded canine ATP6H as a candidate gene for canine copper toxicosis, indicating that some other unidentified gene is responsible for this copper storage disease.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 18, 2014

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