Asymmetric cell division in the morphogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster macrochaetae

Asymmetric cell division in the morphogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster macrochaetae Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is the basic process which creates diversity in the cells of multi-cellular organisms. As a result of asymmetric cell division, daughter cells acquire the ability to differentiate and specialize in a given direction, which is different from that of their parent cells and from each other. This type of division is observed in a wide range of living organisms from bacteria to vertebrates. It has been shown that the molecular-genetic control mechanism of ACD is evolutionally conservative. The proteins involved in the process of ACD in different kinds of animals have a high degree of homology. Sensory organs—bristles (macrochaetae)—of Drosophila are widely used as a model system for studying the genetic control mechanisms of asymmetric division. Bristles located in an orderly manner on the head and body of the fly play the role of mechanoreceptors. Each of them consists of four specialized cells—offspring of the only sensory organ precursor cell (SOP), which differentiates from the wing imaginal disc at the larval stage of the late third age. The basic differentiation and further specialization of the daughter cells of SOP is an asymmetric division process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

Asymmetric cell division in the morphogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster macrochaetae

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1062360411010036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is the basic process which creates diversity in the cells of multi-cellular organisms. As a result of asymmetric cell division, daughter cells acquire the ability to differentiate and specialize in a given direction, which is different from that of their parent cells and from each other. This type of division is observed in a wide range of living organisms from bacteria to vertebrates. It has been shown that the molecular-genetic control mechanism of ACD is evolutionally conservative. The proteins involved in the process of ACD in different kinds of animals have a high degree of homology. Sensory organs—bristles (macrochaetae)—of Drosophila are widely used as a model system for studying the genetic control mechanisms of asymmetric division. Bristles located in an orderly manner on the head and body of the fly play the role of mechanoreceptors. Each of them consists of four specialized cells—offspring of the only sensory organ precursor cell (SOP), which differentiates from the wing imaginal disc at the larval stage of the late third age. The basic differentiation and further specialization of the daughter cells of SOP is an asymmetric division process.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 7, 2011

References

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