Association Between Serum Zinc Levels and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: a Meta-Analysis

Association Between Serum Zinc Levels and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: a Meta-Analysis Recent studies have found that the serum zinc levels were associated with the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the results were inconsistent. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from observational studies between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search in PubMed, Embase, and Web of science up to July, 10, 2016. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) with random-effect model was used to combine the results. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg’s regression asymmetry test. A total of 11 articles involving 822 PD patients and 777 healthy controls were included in the meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis results revealed that the serum zinc levels in PD patients were significantly lower than those in health controls (SMD = −0.779, 95%CI = [−1.323, −0.234], P < 0.001). The association was also significant oriental studies (SMD = −1.601, 95%CI = [−2.398, −0.805], P < 0.001). No publication bias was found. The current study indicated that serum zinc levels in PD patients were significantly lower than those in healthy controls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Trace Element Research Springer Journals

Association Between Serum Zinc Levels and the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: a Meta-Analysis

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Biotechnology; Nutrition; Oncology
ISSN
0163-4984
eISSN
1559-0720
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12011-017-0941-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent studies have found that the serum zinc levels were associated with the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the results were inconsistent. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from observational studies between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search in PubMed, Embase, and Web of science up to July, 10, 2016. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) with random-effect model was used to combine the results. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg’s regression asymmetry test. A total of 11 articles involving 822 PD patients and 777 healthy controls were included in the meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis results revealed that the serum zinc levels in PD patients were significantly lower than those in health controls (SMD = −0.779, 95%CI = [−1.323, −0.234], P < 0.001). The association was also significant oriental studies (SMD = −1.601, 95%CI = [−2.398, −0.805], P < 0.001). No publication bias was found. The current study indicated that serum zinc levels in PD patients were significantly lower than those in healthy controls.

Journal

Biological Trace Element ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 3, 2017

References

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