Assistive devices: an effective strategy in non-pharmacological treatment for hand osteoarthritis—randomized clinical trial

Assistive devices: an effective strategy in non-pharmacological treatment for hand... This study aims to evaluate the use of assistive devices as a strategy in non-pharmacological treatment for hand osteoarthritis (HOA). This is a randomized, prospective, parallel, assessor-blinded clinical trial, in which patients with a diagnosis of HOA were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG), where they received assistive devices for daily life activities, or to a control group (CG), where they received a guideline leaflet with information on joint protection and disease features. The primary outcomes considered were occupational performance, measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and hand function was evaluated through the Score for the Assessment and Quantification of Chronic Rheumatoid Affections of the Hands (SACRAH). The secondary outcomes were pain, measured by the visual analog scale (VAS), and quality of life, measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF). We compared both outcomes before and after interventions and outcomes between groups. Participants from the two groups were assessed at the time of inclusion in the study, 30, and 90 days after initial evaluation. Out of the 39 patients included, 19 were allocated to the IG and 20 to the CG. Only two patients from the CG did not complete the follow-up period. The patients’ hand function and occupational performance improved after intervention (30 days—SACRAH—p < 0.05; COPM—p < 0.05; VAS—p < 0.05). When comparing results between the groups, there was a statistical difference in COPM (performance—p < 0.001; and satisfaction—p < 0.001), in the first reevaluation carried out. The use of assistive devices has proved to be an effective alternative in non-pharmacological treatment for HOA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rheumatology International Springer Journals

Assistive devices: an effective strategy in non-pharmacological treatment for hand osteoarthritis—randomized clinical trial

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Rheumatology
ISSN
0172-8172
eISSN
1437-160X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00296-017-3892-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aims to evaluate the use of assistive devices as a strategy in non-pharmacological treatment for hand osteoarthritis (HOA). This is a randomized, prospective, parallel, assessor-blinded clinical trial, in which patients with a diagnosis of HOA were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG), where they received assistive devices for daily life activities, or to a control group (CG), where they received a guideline leaflet with information on joint protection and disease features. The primary outcomes considered were occupational performance, measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and hand function was evaluated through the Score for the Assessment and Quantification of Chronic Rheumatoid Affections of the Hands (SACRAH). The secondary outcomes were pain, measured by the visual analog scale (VAS), and quality of life, measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF). We compared both outcomes before and after interventions and outcomes between groups. Participants from the two groups were assessed at the time of inclusion in the study, 30, and 90 days after initial evaluation. Out of the 39 patients included, 19 were allocated to the IG and 20 to the CG. Only two patients from the CG did not complete the follow-up period. The patients’ hand function and occupational performance improved after intervention (30 days—SACRAH—p < 0.05; COPM—p < 0.05; VAS—p < 0.05). When comparing results between the groups, there was a statistical difference in COPM (performance—p < 0.001; and satisfaction—p < 0.001), in the first reevaluation carried out. The use of assistive devices has proved to be an effective alternative in non-pharmacological treatment for HOA.

Journal

Rheumatology InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 28, 2017

References

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