Assimilation of Ammonium Nitrogen by Heterotrophic and Symbiotrophic White Lupine Plants

Assimilation of Ammonium Nitrogen by Heterotrophic and Symbiotrophic White Lupine Plants The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, asparagine synthetase, and total glutamine synthetase in the organs of the white lupine (Lupinus albus L.) plants were measured during plant growth and development. In addition, the dynamics of free amino acids and amides in plant organs was followed. It was shown that the change in the nutrition type was important for controlling enzyme activities in the organs examined and, consequently, for directing the pathway of ammonium nitrogen assimilation. As long as the plants remained heterotrophic, glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase of cotyledons and glutamine synthetase of leaves apparently played a major role in the assimilation of ammonium nitrogen. In symbiotrophic plants, root nodules became an exclusive site of asparagine synthesis, and the role of leaf glutamine synthetase increased. Unlike glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was present in all organs examined and was less dependent on the nutrition type. This was also indicated by a weak correlation of glutamate dehydrogenase activity with the dynamics of free amino acid and amide content in these organs. It is supposed that glutamine synthetase plays a leading role in both the primary assimilation of ammonium, produced during symbiotic fixation of molecular nitrogen in root nodules, and in its secondary assimilation in cotyledons and leaves. On the other hand, secondary nitrogen assimilation in the axial organs occurs via an alternative glutamate dehydrogenase pathway. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Assimilation of Ammonium Nitrogen by Heterotrophic and Symbiotrophic White Lupine Plants

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1020280616578
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, asparagine synthetase, and total glutamine synthetase in the organs of the white lupine (Lupinus albus L.) plants were measured during plant growth and development. In addition, the dynamics of free amino acids and amides in plant organs was followed. It was shown that the change in the nutrition type was important for controlling enzyme activities in the organs examined and, consequently, for directing the pathway of ammonium nitrogen assimilation. As long as the plants remained heterotrophic, glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase of cotyledons and glutamine synthetase of leaves apparently played a major role in the assimilation of ammonium nitrogen. In symbiotrophic plants, root nodules became an exclusive site of asparagine synthesis, and the role of leaf glutamine synthetase increased. Unlike glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was present in all organs examined and was less dependent on the nutrition type. This was also indicated by a weak correlation of glutamate dehydrogenase activity with the dynamics of free amino acid and amide content in these organs. It is supposed that glutamine synthetase plays a leading role in both the primary assimilation of ammonium, produced during symbiotic fixation of molecular nitrogen in root nodules, and in its secondary assimilation in cotyledons and leaves. On the other hand, secondary nitrogen assimilation in the axial organs occurs via an alternative glutamate dehydrogenase pathway.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

References

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