Assessing the Quality of a Non-randomized Pragmatic Trial for Primary Prevention of Falls among Older Adults

Assessing the Quality of a Non-randomized Pragmatic Trial for Primary Prevention of Falls among... Current approaches to falls prevention mostly rely on secondary and tertiary prevention and target individuals at high risk of falls. An alternative is primary prevention, in which all seniors are screened, referred as appropriate, and educated regarding falls risk. Little information is available on research designs that allow investigation of this approach in the setting of aging services delivery, where randomization may not be possible. Healthy Steps for Older Adults, a statewide program of the Pennsylvania (PA) Department of Aging, involves a combination of education about falls and screening for balance problems, with referral to personal physicians and home safety assessments. We developed a non-randomized statewide trial, Falls Free PA, to assess its effectiveness in reducing falls incidence over 12 months. We recruited 814 seniors who completed the program (503 first-time participants, 311 people repeating the program) and 1,020 who did not participate in the program, from the same sites. We assessed the quality of this non-randomized design by examining recruitment, follow-up across study groups, and comparability at baseline. Of older adults approached in senior centers, 90.5 % (n = 2,219) signed informed consent, and 1,834 (82.4 %) completed baseline assessments and were eligible for follow-up. Attrition in the three groups over 12 months was low and non-differential (<10 % for withdrawal and <2 % for other loss to follow-up). Median follow-up, which involved standardized monthly assessment of falls, was 10 months in all study groups. At baseline, the groups did not differ in measures of health or falls risk factors. Comparable status at baseline, recruitment from common sites, and similar experience with retention suggest that the non-randomized design will be effective for assessment of this approach to primary prevention of falls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Assessing the Quality of a Non-randomized Pragmatic Trial for Primary Prevention of Falls among Older Adults

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/assessing-the-quality-of-a-non-randomized-pragmatic-trial-for-primary-9Ylf0qfPh5
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-014-0466-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current approaches to falls prevention mostly rely on secondary and tertiary prevention and target individuals at high risk of falls. An alternative is primary prevention, in which all seniors are screened, referred as appropriate, and educated regarding falls risk. Little information is available on research designs that allow investigation of this approach in the setting of aging services delivery, where randomization may not be possible. Healthy Steps for Older Adults, a statewide program of the Pennsylvania (PA) Department of Aging, involves a combination of education about falls and screening for balance problems, with referral to personal physicians and home safety assessments. We developed a non-randomized statewide trial, Falls Free PA, to assess its effectiveness in reducing falls incidence over 12 months. We recruited 814 seniors who completed the program (503 first-time participants, 311 people repeating the program) and 1,020 who did not participate in the program, from the same sites. We assessed the quality of this non-randomized design by examining recruitment, follow-up across study groups, and comparability at baseline. Of older adults approached in senior centers, 90.5 % (n = 2,219) signed informed consent, and 1,834 (82.4 %) completed baseline assessments and were eligible for follow-up. Attrition in the three groups over 12 months was low and non-differential (<10 % for withdrawal and <2 % for other loss to follow-up). Median follow-up, which involved standardized monthly assessment of falls, was 10 months in all study groups. At baseline, the groups did not differ in measures of health or falls risk factors. Comparable status at baseline, recruitment from common sites, and similar experience with retention suggest that the non-randomized design will be effective for assessment of this approach to primary prevention of falls.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 2, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off