Assessing Anomalous Perceptual Experiences in Nonpsychiatric Individuals and Outpatients with Psychosis in Taiwan: An Investigation Using the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS)

Assessing Anomalous Perceptual Experiences in Nonpsychiatric Individuals and Outpatients with... The Cardiff anomalous perceptions scale (CAPS) has been recently designed for the assessment of anomalous perceptual experiences in the general population, and includes dimensions that measure distress, intrusiveness, and frequency. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a Taiwanese version of the CAPS. The English version of the CAPS was translated into Taiwanese (CAPS-T) and the latter was applied to this study. We administered the questionnaire to a consecutive sample of 192 participants with (n = 106; clinical group including schizophrenia and affective psychosis) or without psychotic disorders (n = 86; non-clinical group). In addition to the CAPS-T, the Taiwanese version of the brief psychiatric symptom rating scale (BSRS) measured the severity of the psychopathology. We also tested the psychometric properties of the CAPS-T including construct validity, internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and convergent and discriminative validity. Overall, the CAPS-T showed good construct validity, internal consistency, and stability over time and correlated significantly with the psychoticism subscale of the BSRS. As predicted, the mean differences in CAPS-T scores between participants with or without a psychotic disorder were significant. Convergent and discriminative validity were satisfactory. A score of 5 was found to the best threshold in discriminating between clinical and non-clinical samples. Our findings indicate that the Taiwanese version of the CAPS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure the multidimensionality of perceptual anomalies in general and appears to complement the clinical measures of psychosis proneness in Taiwan. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Assessing Anomalous Perceptual Experiences in Nonpsychiatric Individuals and Outpatients with Psychosis in Taiwan: An Investigation Using the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS)

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-012-9234-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Cardiff anomalous perceptions scale (CAPS) has been recently designed for the assessment of anomalous perceptual experiences in the general population, and includes dimensions that measure distress, intrusiveness, and frequency. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a Taiwanese version of the CAPS. The English version of the CAPS was translated into Taiwanese (CAPS-T) and the latter was applied to this study. We administered the questionnaire to a consecutive sample of 192 participants with (n = 106; clinical group including schizophrenia and affective psychosis) or without psychotic disorders (n = 86; non-clinical group). In addition to the CAPS-T, the Taiwanese version of the brief psychiatric symptom rating scale (BSRS) measured the severity of the psychopathology. We also tested the psychometric properties of the CAPS-T including construct validity, internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and convergent and discriminative validity. Overall, the CAPS-T showed good construct validity, internal consistency, and stability over time and correlated significantly with the psychoticism subscale of the BSRS. As predicted, the mean differences in CAPS-T scores between participants with or without a psychotic disorder were significant. Convergent and discriminative validity were satisfactory. A score of 5 was found to the best threshold in discriminating between clinical and non-clinical samples. Our findings indicate that the Taiwanese version of the CAPS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure the multidimensionality of perceptual anomalies in general and appears to complement the clinical measures of psychosis proneness in Taiwan.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 10, 2012

References

  • Phenomenological dimensions of sensory gating
    Heitrick, WP; Erickson, MA; Smith, DA

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