Asking the right questions about the psychology of human inquiry: Nine open challenges

Asking the right questions about the psychology of human inquiry: Nine open challenges The ability to act on the world with the goal of gaining information is core to human adaptability and intelligence. Perhaps the most successful and influential account of such abilities is the Optimal Experiment Design (OED) hypothesis, which argues that humans intuitively perform experiments on the world similar to the way an effective scientist plans an experiment. The widespread application of this theory within many areas of psychology calls for a critical evaluation of the theory’s core claims. Despite many successes, we argue that the OED hypothesis remains lacking as a theory of human inquiry and that research in the area often fails to confront some of the most interesting and important questions. In this critical review, we raise and discuss nine open questions about the psychology of human inquiry. Keywords Inquiry · Information search · Information gain · Optimal experiment design · Active learning · Question asking Introduction general statistical framework that quantifies the value of a possible experiment with respect to the experimenter’s The ability to ask questions, collect information, and beliefs and learning goals and can help researchers plan actively explore one’s environment is a powerful tool for informative experiments. The psychological claim is that learning http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychonomic Bulletin & Review Springer Journals

Asking the right questions about the psychology of human inquiry: Nine open challenges

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Cognitive Psychology
ISSN
1069-9384
eISSN
1531-5320
D.O.I.
10.3758/s13423-018-1470-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ability to act on the world with the goal of gaining information is core to human adaptability and intelligence. Perhaps the most successful and influential account of such abilities is the Optimal Experiment Design (OED) hypothesis, which argues that humans intuitively perform experiments on the world similar to the way an effective scientist plans an experiment. The widespread application of this theory within many areas of psychology calls for a critical evaluation of the theory’s core claims. Despite many successes, we argue that the OED hypothesis remains lacking as a theory of human inquiry and that research in the area often fails to confront some of the most interesting and important questions. In this critical review, we raise and discuss nine open questions about the psychology of human inquiry. Keywords Inquiry · Information search · Information gain · Optimal experiment design · Active learning · Question asking Introduction general statistical framework that quantifies the value of a possible experiment with respect to the experimenter’s The ability to ask questions, collect information, and beliefs and learning goals and can help researchers plan actively explore one’s environment is a powerful tool for informative experiments. The psychological claim is that learning

Journal

Psychonomic Bulletin & ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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