Arteriosclerosis Is a Major Predictor of Small Bowel Vascular Lesions

Arteriosclerosis Is a Major Predictor of Small Bowel Vascular Lesions Background Most studies have focused on evaluating the association between the presence of small bowel vascular lesions (SBVLs) and patients’ comorbidities. Aims We sought to uncover a more fundamental indicator that may predict the presence of SBVLs by considering athero- sclerosis qualitatively and quantitatively. Methods We enrolled 79 consecutive patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding who had undergone computed tomog- raphy (CT) and capsule endoscopy or double-balloon endoscopy from January 2015 to June 2017. The SBVL frequency, type, and location, and the relationship between the presence of SBVLs and the patients’ clinical characteristics were evalu- ated. Arterial wall calcification was assessed on unenhanced CT images, and a modified Agatston scoring system was used to determine the abdominal aorta calcium scores. Results Of the 27 (34%) patients with SBVLs, 15 (19%) had type 1a, 12 (15%) had type 1b, and 2 (3%) had type 2a SBVLs. Most of the lesions were located in the jejunum. Cardiovascular disease (P = .017), chronic kidney disease (P = .025), and arteriosclerosis (P = .0036) were associated with the presence of SBVLs. Subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that arteriosclerosis (odds ratio [OR] 7.29; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–143.9) and superior mesenteric artery calcification (OR 16.3; 95% CI 3.64–118.6) were independent predictors of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Digestive Diseases and Sciences Springer Journals

Arteriosclerosis Is a Major Predictor of Small Bowel Vascular Lesions

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gastroenterology; Hepatology; Oncology; Transplant Surgery; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0163-2116
eISSN
1573-2568
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10620-018-4930-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Most studies have focused on evaluating the association between the presence of small bowel vascular lesions (SBVLs) and patients’ comorbidities. Aims We sought to uncover a more fundamental indicator that may predict the presence of SBVLs by considering athero- sclerosis qualitatively and quantitatively. Methods We enrolled 79 consecutive patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding who had undergone computed tomog- raphy (CT) and capsule endoscopy or double-balloon endoscopy from January 2015 to June 2017. The SBVL frequency, type, and location, and the relationship between the presence of SBVLs and the patients’ clinical characteristics were evalu- ated. Arterial wall calcification was assessed on unenhanced CT images, and a modified Agatston scoring system was used to determine the abdominal aorta calcium scores. Results Of the 27 (34%) patients with SBVLs, 15 (19%) had type 1a, 12 (15%) had type 1b, and 2 (3%) had type 2a SBVLs. Most of the lesions were located in the jejunum. Cardiovascular disease (P = .017), chronic kidney disease (P = .025), and arteriosclerosis (P = .0036) were associated with the presence of SBVLs. Subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that arteriosclerosis (odds ratio [OR] 7.29; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–143.9) and superior mesenteric artery calcification (OR 16.3; 95% CI 3.64–118.6) were independent predictors of

Journal

Digestive Diseases and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 25, 2018

References

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