Are introduced plants a threat to native pollinator services in montane–alpine environments?

Are introduced plants a threat to native pollinator services in montane–alpine environments? While introduced plants often have restricted distributions at high elevations, their impacts may be more extensive if they compete for native pollinators, potentially reducing pollinator services to native biotically pollinated plants. Conversely, introduced biotically pollinated plants might facilitate improved pollinator services to native plants by supporting higher pollinator densities and extending the flowering season. We examined weekly pollinator visitation to native and introduced plants, at v fi e elevations over two o fl wering seasons on The Remarkables range, south-central South Island, New Zealand. In this area, introduced plants dominate the vegetation at lower elevations but are restricted to disturbed areas above treeline. We tested whether pollinator visitation rates and quantities of introduced pollen on insects or transferred to native flowers differed with elevation and community context, or with the local abundance of introduced flowers regardless of elevation. Introduced biotically pollinated plants produced more flowers and flowered later than most native species and were extensively utilised by native solitary bees. Weekly visitation rates to native flowers were higher in the first half of the flowering season than the second half, and were positively correlated with visitation rates to co-occurring introduced flowers. Introduced flower abundance did not affect visitation to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Helvetica Springer Journals

Are introduced plants a threat to native pollinator services in montane–alpine environments?

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Swiss Botanical Society
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Ecology; Ecology; Life Sciences, general; Forestry
ISSN
0253-1453
eISSN
1664-221X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00035-018-0206-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While introduced plants often have restricted distributions at high elevations, their impacts may be more extensive if they compete for native pollinators, potentially reducing pollinator services to native biotically pollinated plants. Conversely, introduced biotically pollinated plants might facilitate improved pollinator services to native plants by supporting higher pollinator densities and extending the flowering season. We examined weekly pollinator visitation to native and introduced plants, at v fi e elevations over two o fl wering seasons on The Remarkables range, south-central South Island, New Zealand. In this area, introduced plants dominate the vegetation at lower elevations but are restricted to disturbed areas above treeline. We tested whether pollinator visitation rates and quantities of introduced pollen on insects or transferred to native flowers differed with elevation and community context, or with the local abundance of introduced flowers regardless of elevation. Introduced biotically pollinated plants produced more flowers and flowered later than most native species and were extensively utilised by native solitary bees. Weekly visitation rates to native flowers were higher in the first half of the flowering season than the second half, and were positively correlated with visitation rates to co-occurring introduced flowers. Introduced flower abundance did not affect visitation to

Journal

Botanica HelveticaSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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