Are ecological differences of irruptive bird species from typical migrants real? (The example of the long-tailed tit Aegithalos c. caudatus)

Are ecological differences of irruptive bird species from typical migrants real? (The example of... Using the long-tailed tit (Aegithalos c. caudatus) as an example of the so-called irruptive species, the ecophysiological characteristics (body mass, fat reserves) and migration speed during autumn period were analyzed. The mean body mass and the median fat score did not depend on the number of migrating individuals. There was no evidence of the so-called stress in birds, participating in migration: migrants had even higher fat reserves than residents, while no significant difference in the body mass was recorded. The increase in fat reserves in the long-tailed tit during migration period was similar to the seasonal changes in energy reserves known for typical migrants. This makes it possible for late-migrating individuals to maintain higher total speed of migration compared to early-migrating ones. Basing on the obtained data, we conclude that the ecophysiological characteristics of the long-tailed tits migrating in autumn are similar to those of regular migrants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Are ecological differences of irruptive bird species from typical migrants real? (The example of the long-tailed tit Aegithalos c. caudatus)

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Environment, general; Ecology
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1067413610050103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using the long-tailed tit (Aegithalos c. caudatus) as an example of the so-called irruptive species, the ecophysiological characteristics (body mass, fat reserves) and migration speed during autumn period were analyzed. The mean body mass and the median fat score did not depend on the number of migrating individuals. There was no evidence of the so-called stress in birds, participating in migration: migrants had even higher fat reserves than residents, while no significant difference in the body mass was recorded. The increase in fat reserves in the long-tailed tit during migration period was similar to the seasonal changes in energy reserves known for typical migrants. This makes it possible for late-migrating individuals to maintain higher total speed of migration compared to early-migrating ones. Basing on the obtained data, we conclude that the ecophysiological characteristics of the long-tailed tits migrating in autumn are similar to those of regular migrants.

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 25, 2010

References

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