Arctica islandica: the longest lived non colonial animal known to science

Arctica islandica: the longest lived non colonial animal known to science The ocean quahog, Arctica islandica is not just the longest living bivalve, it is also the longest lived, non-colonial animal known to science. With the maximum life span potential ever increasing and currently standing in excess of 400 years the clam has recently gained interest as a potential model organism for ageing research. This review details what is known about the biology of A. islandica, it discusses observed age-associated changes and reviews previous ageing research undertaken on the species and other long-lived bivalves which may be applicable to future ageing research and discusses future directions for ageing research with A. islandica. Historically much of the research on bivalves has been targeted at their utilization as a food source, environmental sentinels and more recently the use of their shells as archives of environmental change. The result of this has been an abundance of knowledge on bivalve life strategies, and a limited amount of information on the physiological changes in the cells and tissues of bivalves during the ageing process. However, research into the mechanisms of senescence of long-lived bivalves from a biogerontological perspective has advanced only recently. The research undertaken thus far has documented age-related differences in anti-oxidant defences and accumulation of oxidative products but despite the recent attention into ageing of A. islandica it is still to be ascertained if the species experiences senescence. Future directions for ageing research using A. islandica are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Arctica islandica: the longest lived non colonial animal known to science

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-010-9171-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ocean quahog, Arctica islandica is not just the longest living bivalve, it is also the longest lived, non-colonial animal known to science. With the maximum life span potential ever increasing and currently standing in excess of 400 years the clam has recently gained interest as a potential model organism for ageing research. This review details what is known about the biology of A. islandica, it discusses observed age-associated changes and reviews previous ageing research undertaken on the species and other long-lived bivalves which may be applicable to future ageing research and discusses future directions for ageing research with A. islandica. Historically much of the research on bivalves has been targeted at their utilization as a food source, environmental sentinels and more recently the use of their shells as archives of environmental change. The result of this has been an abundance of knowledge on bivalve life strategies, and a limited amount of information on the physiological changes in the cells and tissues of bivalves during the ageing process. However, research into the mechanisms of senescence of long-lived bivalves from a biogerontological perspective has advanced only recently. The research undertaken thus far has documented age-related differences in anti-oxidant defences and accumulation of oxidative products but despite the recent attention into ageing of A. islandica it is still to be ascertained if the species experiences senescence. Future directions for ageing research using A. islandica are discussed.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 11, 2010

References

  • An experimental paradigm for the study of slowly-ageing organisms
    Austad, SN
  • High frequency of gonadal neoplasia in a hard clam (Mercenaria spp.) hybrid zone
    Bert, TM; Hesselman, DM; Arnold, WS; Moore, WS; Cruz-Lopez, H; Marelli, DC
  • Comparative analysis of gender-associated complete mitochondrial genomes in marine mussels (Mytilus spp.)
    Breton, S; Burger, G; Stewart, DT; Blier, PU
  • The Naked Mole-Rat: a new long-living model for human ageing research
    Buffenstein, R
  • The role of bivalve molluscs as tools in estuarine sediment toxicity testing: a review
    Byrne, PA; O’Halloran, J
  • Sarcopenia in the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx correlates with muscle contraction rate over lifespan
    Chow, DK; Glenn, CF; Johnston, JL

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