Arabidopsis thaliana thymidine kinase 1a is ubiquitously expressed during development and contributes to confer tolerance to genotoxic stress

Arabidopsis thaliana thymidine kinase 1a is ubiquitously expressed during development and... Thymidine kinase catalyzes the first step in the nucleotide salvage pathway by transferring a phosphate group to a thymidine molecule. In mammals thymidine kinase supplies deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication and DNA repair, and the expression of the gene is tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Although this gene is phylogenetically conserved in many taxa, its physiological function in plants remains unknown. The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has two thymidine kinase genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b) and microarray data suggest they might have redundant roles. In this study we analyzed the TK1a function by evaluating its expression pattern during development and in response to genotoxic stress. We also studied its role in DNA repair by the characterization of a mutant that contained the T-DNA insertion in the promoter region of the TK1a gene. We found that TK1a is expressed in most tissues during plant development and it was differentially induced by ultraviolet-C radiation because TK1b expression was unaffected. In the mutant, the T-DNA insertion caused a 40 % rise in transcript levels and enzyme activity in Arabidopsis seedlings compared to wild-type plants. This elevation was enough to confer tolerance to ultraviolet-C irradiation in dark conditions, as determined by root growth, and meristem length and structure. TK1a overexpression also provided tolerance to genotoxins that induce double-strand break. Our results suggest that thymidine kinase contributes to several DNA repair pathways by providing deoxythymidine triphosphate that serve as precursors for DNA repair and to balance deoxyribonucleotides pools. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Arabidopsis thaliana thymidine kinase 1a is ubiquitously expressed during development and contributes to confer tolerance to genotoxic stress

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-014-0277-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thymidine kinase catalyzes the first step in the nucleotide salvage pathway by transferring a phosphate group to a thymidine molecule. In mammals thymidine kinase supplies deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication and DNA repair, and the expression of the gene is tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Although this gene is phylogenetically conserved in many taxa, its physiological function in plants remains unknown. The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has two thymidine kinase genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b) and microarray data suggest they might have redundant roles. In this study we analyzed the TK1a function by evaluating its expression pattern during development and in response to genotoxic stress. We also studied its role in DNA repair by the characterization of a mutant that contained the T-DNA insertion in the promoter region of the TK1a gene. We found that TK1a is expressed in most tissues during plant development and it was differentially induced by ultraviolet-C radiation because TK1b expression was unaffected. In the mutant, the T-DNA insertion caused a 40 % rise in transcript levels and enzyme activity in Arabidopsis seedlings compared to wild-type plants. This elevation was enough to confer tolerance to ultraviolet-C irradiation in dark conditions, as determined by root growth, and meristem length and structure. TK1a overexpression also provided tolerance to genotoxins that induce double-strand break. Our results suggest that thymidine kinase contributes to several DNA repair pathways by providing deoxythymidine triphosphate that serve as precursors for DNA repair and to balance deoxyribonucleotides pools.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 24, 2014

References

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