Aqueous pathways for formation of zinc oxide particles in the presence of carboxymethyl inulin

Aqueous pathways for formation of zinc oxide particles in the presence of carboxymethyl inulin In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals were obtained by a simple wet chemical method using zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O) and hexamethylenetetramine as the starting materials in the presence of the water-soluble biopolymer carboxymethyl inulin (CMI). We investigated the effect of reaction temperature and CMI concentration on the morphology, surface area, particle size, and size distribution of zinc oxide. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the XRD patterns for all the samples were similar to that of ZnO with the wurtzite structure, irrespective of the geometric shape of the particle. The ZnO rod grows preferentially along the [001] direction in the absence of the CMI. The biopolymer affects the ZnO crystals in a concentration-dependent manner by altering the growth rate of the particles along the c-axis and a-axis. The vast majority of the crystals have a central grain boundary in the presence of CMI. The precipitate consisted of micrometer-sized hexagonally shaped bipyramidal ZnO crystals and nanocrystals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Aqueous pathways for formation of zinc oxide particles in the presence of carboxymethyl inulin

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry; Catalysis; Physical Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11164-011-0481-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals were obtained by a simple wet chemical method using zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO3)2·6H2O) and hexamethylenetetramine as the starting materials in the presence of the water-soluble biopolymer carboxymethyl inulin (CMI). We investigated the effect of reaction temperature and CMI concentration on the morphology, surface area, particle size, and size distribution of zinc oxide. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the XRD patterns for all the samples were similar to that of ZnO with the wurtzite structure, irrespective of the geometric shape of the particle. The ZnO rod grows preferentially along the [001] direction in the absence of the CMI. The biopolymer affects the ZnO crystals in a concentration-dependent manner by altering the growth rate of the particles along the c-axis and a-axis. The vast majority of the crystals have a central grain boundary in the presence of CMI. The precipitate consisted of micrometer-sized hexagonally shaped bipyramidal ZnO crystals and nanocrystals.

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 13, 2012

References

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