Antibacterials/fluconazole/pantoprazole

Antibacterials/fluconazole/pantoprazole Reactions 1680, p33 - 2 Dec 2017 DRESS syndrome: case report A 64-year-old woman developed DRESS syndrome following the administration of meropenem and vancomycin. Subsequently, she developed DRESS flare up while receiving ciprofloxacin, daptomycin, fluconazole and pantoprazole [routes and dosages not stated; not all indications stated]. The woman had received piperacillin/tazobactam following perforation of duodenum. Her antibacterials therapy was later changed to meropenem and vancomycin. Twenty-four days later, she developed a maculopapular rash on trunk. The rash subsequently progressed to her limbs and face, and was associated with axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. She also developed fever (38.8 C). Laboratory tests were positive for IgG. Meropenem and vancomycin were replaced with ciprofloxacin and daptomycin and the woman was treated with methylprednisolone. Despite treatment, her exanthema worsened along with appearance of bullous skin lesions. A skin biopsy showed eosinophilic and neutrophilic perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. Laboratory investigations showed elevated liver enzymes, eosinophilia, CRP of 72 mg/L and fever (39.9 C). Based on these investigations, DRESS syndrome was confirmed due to meropenem and vancomycin, while the flare up was attributed to ciprofloxacin and daptomycin. Her antibacterials treatment was discontinued while methylprednisolone was continued. Afterwards, she experienced flare up due to temporarily discontinuation of corticosteroids. Subsequently, she started receiving fluconazole and pantoprazole. Twenty-four hours after starting fluconazole and pantoprazole, she experienced third flare up. Later, she also experienced fourth flare up due to a reactivation of cytomegalovirus. All her medications were discontinued and subsequently her symptoms resolved. A patch and lymphocyte transformation test confirmed the sensitisation to meropenem and vancomycin. Sensitization to ciprofloxacin was absent. She was re-administered pantoprazole without any occurrence of DRESS symptoms. Author comment: "DRESS to meropenem and vancomycin with flare up on ciprofloxacin and daptomycin was suspected." "The suspected third relapse developed within 24 h after exposure to pantoprazole and fluconazole and recovered very soon after stopping these drugs". Jorg-Walther L, et al. Flare-up reactions in severe drug hypersensitivity: infection or ongoing T-cell hyperresponsiveness. Clinical Case Reports 3: 798-801, No. 10, Oct 2015. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.346 - Switzerland 803284575 0114-9954/17/1680-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Dec 2017 No. 1680 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Antibacterials/fluconazole/pantoprazole

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1680 (1) – Dec 2, 2017
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40278-017-38964-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1680, p33 - 2 Dec 2017 DRESS syndrome: case report A 64-year-old woman developed DRESS syndrome following the administration of meropenem and vancomycin. Subsequently, she developed DRESS flare up while receiving ciprofloxacin, daptomycin, fluconazole and pantoprazole [routes and dosages not stated; not all indications stated]. The woman had received piperacillin/tazobactam following perforation of duodenum. Her antibacterials therapy was later changed to meropenem and vancomycin. Twenty-four days later, she developed a maculopapular rash on trunk. The rash subsequently progressed to her limbs and face, and was associated with axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. She also developed fever (38.8 C). Laboratory tests were positive for IgG. Meropenem and vancomycin were replaced with ciprofloxacin and daptomycin and the woman was treated with methylprednisolone. Despite treatment, her exanthema worsened along with appearance of bullous skin lesions. A skin biopsy showed eosinophilic and neutrophilic perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. Laboratory investigations showed elevated liver enzymes, eosinophilia, CRP of 72 mg/L and fever (39.9 C). Based on these investigations, DRESS syndrome was confirmed due to meropenem and vancomycin, while the flare up was attributed to ciprofloxacin and daptomycin. Her antibacterials treatment was discontinued while methylprednisolone was continued. Afterwards, she experienced flare up due to temporarily discontinuation of corticosteroids. Subsequently, she started receiving fluconazole and pantoprazole. Twenty-four hours after starting fluconazole and pantoprazole, she experienced third flare up. Later, she also experienced fourth flare up due to a reactivation of cytomegalovirus. All her medications were discontinued and subsequently her symptoms resolved. A patch and lymphocyte transformation test confirmed the sensitisation to meropenem and vancomycin. Sensitization to ciprofloxacin was absent. She was re-administered pantoprazole without any occurrence of DRESS symptoms. Author comment: "DRESS to meropenem and vancomycin with flare up on ciprofloxacin and daptomycin was suspected." "The suspected third relapse developed within 24 h after exposure to pantoprazole and fluconazole and recovered very soon after stopping these drugs". Jorg-Walther L, et al. Flare-up reactions in severe drug hypersensitivity: infection or ongoing T-cell hyperresponsiveness. Clinical Case Reports 3: 798-801, No. 10, Oct 2015. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.346 - Switzerland 803284575 0114-9954/17/1680-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Dec 2017 No. 1680

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 2, 2017

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