Anoxia-Hypoxia in Forensic Neuropsychological Assessment: Cognitive Impact of Pulmonary Injuries, Respiratory Distress, Cerebral Blood Hypoperfusion, and Major Surgeries

Anoxia-Hypoxia in Forensic Neuropsychological Assessment: Cognitive Impact of Pulmonary Injuries,... Pulmonary injuries, respiratory distress, blood loss-related cerebral blood perfusion, and major surgeries are common features of medical histories in forensic neuropsychological assessments. Unless the explicit reason for referral is determination of the cognitive impact of one of these adverse medical conditions, their contribution to neuropsychological causality determination can be overlooked, minimized, or misattributed to other causes. Given the underlying common denominator among these conditions, that is, sub-optimal oxygen delivery to the brain, transient or long-term debilitating injuries causing neuropsycho- logical change of various degrees can result. A thorough understanding of the impact of these medical events is paramount in forensic neuropsychological assessment for diagnosis, causality, and functional impact determination, prognosis, rehabilitation, and recommendations. In this paper, we critically review the available empirical evidence regarding anoxia and hypoxia arising from pulmonary injuries and respiratory distress, cerebral blood hypoperfusion, and major surgeries, together with evidence of their impact on cognitive functioning. Medical and psychological electronic search engines [PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar (up to January 2018)] have been screened for neuroscience-related and neuropsychological literature pertaining to pulmonary injuries and respiratory distress, cerebral blood perfusion, and major surgeries, and subsequently optimized for the issue under review. . . . . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Injury and Law Springer Journals

Anoxia-Hypoxia in Forensic Neuropsychological Assessment: Cognitive Impact of Pulmonary Injuries, Respiratory Distress, Cerebral Blood Hypoperfusion, and Major Surgeries

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Psychology; Law and Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychology, general
ISSN
1938-971X
eISSN
1938-9728
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12207-018-9319-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pulmonary injuries, respiratory distress, blood loss-related cerebral blood perfusion, and major surgeries are common features of medical histories in forensic neuropsychological assessments. Unless the explicit reason for referral is determination of the cognitive impact of one of these adverse medical conditions, their contribution to neuropsychological causality determination can be overlooked, minimized, or misattributed to other causes. Given the underlying common denominator among these conditions, that is, sub-optimal oxygen delivery to the brain, transient or long-term debilitating injuries causing neuropsycho- logical change of various degrees can result. A thorough understanding of the impact of these medical events is paramount in forensic neuropsychological assessment for diagnosis, causality, and functional impact determination, prognosis, rehabilitation, and recommendations. In this paper, we critically review the available empirical evidence regarding anoxia and hypoxia arising from pulmonary injuries and respiratory distress, cerebral blood hypoperfusion, and major surgeries, together with evidence of their impact on cognitive functioning. Medical and psychological electronic search engines [PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar (up to January 2018)] have been screened for neuroscience-related and neuropsychological literature pertaining to pulmonary injuries and respiratory distress, cerebral blood perfusion, and major surgeries, and subsequently optimized for the issue under review. . . . . . .

Journal

Psychological Injury and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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