Anatomical structure of Camellia oleifera shell

Anatomical structure of Camellia oleifera shell The main product of Camellia oleifera is edible oil made from the seeds, but huge quantities of agro-waste are produced in the form of shells. The primary components of C. oleifera fruit shell are cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, which probably make it a good eco-friendly non-wood material. Understanding the structure of the shell is however a prerequisite to making full use of it. The anatomical structure of C. oleifera fruit shells was investigated from macroscopic to ultrastructural scale by stereoscopic, optical, and scanning electron microscopy. The main cell morphology in the different parts of the shell was observed and measured using the tissue segregation method. The density of the cross section of the shell was also obtained using an X-ray CT scanner to check the change in texture. The C. oleifera fruit pericarp was made up of exocarp, mesocarp, and endocarp. The main types of exocarp cells were stone cells, spiral vessels, and parenchyma cells. The mesocarp accounted for most of the shell and consisted of parenchyma, tracheids, and some stone cells. The endocarp was basically made up of cells with a thickened cell wall that were modified tracheid or parenchyma cells with secondary wall thickening. The most important ultrastructure in these cells was the pits in the cell wall of stone and vessel cells that give the shell a conducting, mechanical, and protective role. The density of the shell gradually decreased from exocarp to endocarp. Tracheid cells are one of the main cell types in the shell, but their low slenderness (length to width) ratio makes them unsuitable for the manufacture of paper. Further research should be conducted on composite shell-plastic panels (or other reinforced materials) to make better use of this agro-waste. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Protoplasma Springer Journals

Anatomical structure of Camellia oleifera shell

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Plant Sciences; Zoology
ISSN
0033-183X
eISSN
1615-6102
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00709-018-1271-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The main product of Camellia oleifera is edible oil made from the seeds, but huge quantities of agro-waste are produced in the form of shells. The primary components of C. oleifera fruit shell are cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, which probably make it a good eco-friendly non-wood material. Understanding the structure of the shell is however a prerequisite to making full use of it. The anatomical structure of C. oleifera fruit shells was investigated from macroscopic to ultrastructural scale by stereoscopic, optical, and scanning electron microscopy. The main cell morphology in the different parts of the shell was observed and measured using the tissue segregation method. The density of the cross section of the shell was also obtained using an X-ray CT scanner to check the change in texture. The C. oleifera fruit pericarp was made up of exocarp, mesocarp, and endocarp. The main types of exocarp cells were stone cells, spiral vessels, and parenchyma cells. The mesocarp accounted for most of the shell and consisted of parenchyma, tracheids, and some stone cells. The endocarp was basically made up of cells with a thickened cell wall that were modified tracheid or parenchyma cells with secondary wall thickening. The most important ultrastructure in these cells was the pits in the cell wall of stone and vessel cells that give the shell a conducting, mechanical, and protective role. The density of the shell gradually decreased from exocarp to endocarp. Tracheid cells are one of the main cell types in the shell, but their low slenderness (length to width) ratio makes them unsuitable for the manufacture of paper. Further research should be conducted on composite shell-plastic panels (or other reinforced materials) to make better use of this agro-waste.

Journal

ProtoplasmaSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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