Analysis of the Ca2+ domain in the Arabidopsis H+/Ca2+ antiporters CAX1 and CAX3

Analysis of the Ca2+ domain in the Arabidopsis H+/Ca2+ antiporters CAX1 and CAX3 Ca2+ levels in plants are controlled in part by H+/Ca2+ exchangers. Structure/function analysis of the Arabidopsis H+/cation exchanger, CAX1, revealed that a nine amino acid region (87–95) is involved in CAX1-mediated Ca2+ specificity. CAX3 is 77% identical (93% similar) to CAX1, and when expressed in yeast, localizes to the vacuole but does not suppress yeast mutants defective in vacuolar Ca2+ transport. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing CAX3 containing the 9 amino acid Ca2+ domain (Cad) from CAX1 (CAX3-9) displayed altered stress sensitivities similar to CAX1-expressing plants, whereas CAX3-9-expressing plants did not have any altered stress sensitivities. A single leucine-to-isoleucine change at position 87 (CAX3-I) within the Cad of CAX3 allows this protein to weakly transport Ca2+ in yeast (less than 10% of CAX1). Site-directed mutagenesis of the leucine in the CAX3 Cad demonstrated that no amino acid change tested could confer more activity than CAX3-I. Transport studies in yeast demonstrated that the first three amino acids of the CAX1 Cad could confer twice the Ca2+ transport capability compared to CAX3-I. The entire Cad of CAX3 (87–95) inserted into CAX1 abolishes CAX1-mediated Ca2+ transport. However, single, double, or triple amino acid replacements within the native CAX1 Cad did not block CAX1 mediated Ca2+ transport. Together these findings suggest that other domains within CAX1 and CAX3 influence Ca2+ transport. This study has implications for the ability to engineer CAX-mediated transport in plants by manipulating Cad residues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Analysis of the Ca2+ domain in the Arabidopsis H+/Ca2+ antiporters CAX1 and CAX3

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1019880006606
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ca2+ levels in plants are controlled in part by H+/Ca2+ exchangers. Structure/function analysis of the Arabidopsis H+/cation exchanger, CAX1, revealed that a nine amino acid region (87–95) is involved in CAX1-mediated Ca2+ specificity. CAX3 is 77% identical (93% similar) to CAX1, and when expressed in yeast, localizes to the vacuole but does not suppress yeast mutants defective in vacuolar Ca2+ transport. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing CAX3 containing the 9 amino acid Ca2+ domain (Cad) from CAX1 (CAX3-9) displayed altered stress sensitivities similar to CAX1-expressing plants, whereas CAX3-9-expressing plants did not have any altered stress sensitivities. A single leucine-to-isoleucine change at position 87 (CAX3-I) within the Cad of CAX3 allows this protein to weakly transport Ca2+ in yeast (less than 10% of CAX1). Site-directed mutagenesis of the leucine in the CAX3 Cad demonstrated that no amino acid change tested could confer more activity than CAX3-I. Transport studies in yeast demonstrated that the first three amino acids of the CAX1 Cad could confer twice the Ca2+ transport capability compared to CAX3-I. The entire Cad of CAX3 (87–95) inserted into CAX1 abolishes CAX1-mediated Ca2+ transport. However, single, double, or triple amino acid replacements within the native CAX1 Cad did not block CAX1 mediated Ca2+ transport. Together these findings suggest that other domains within CAX1 and CAX3 influence Ca2+ transport. This study has implications for the ability to engineer CAX-mediated transport in plants by manipulating Cad residues.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

References

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