Analysis of Arabidopsis genome sequence reveals a large new gene family in plants

Analysis of Arabidopsis genome sequence reveals a large new gene family in plants A detailed analysis of the currently available Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequence has revealed the presence of a large number of open reading frames with homology to the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S) genes of Papaver rhoeas. The products of these potential genes are all predicted to be relatively small, basic, secreted proteins with similar predicted secondary structures. We have named these potential genes SPH (S-protein homologues). Their presence appears to have been largely missed by the prediction methods currently used on the genomic sequence. Equivalent homologues could not be detected in the human, microbial, Drosophila or C. elegans genomic databases, suggesting a function specific to plants. Preliminary RT-PCR analysis indicates that at least two members of the family (SPH1, SPH8) are expressed, with expression being greatest in floral tissues. The gene family may total more than 100 members, and its discovery not only illustrates the importance of the genome sequencing efforts, but also indicates the extent of information which remains hidden after the initial trawl for potential genes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Analysis of Arabidopsis genome sequence reveals a large new gene family in plants

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/analysis-of-arabidopsis-genome-sequence-reveals-a-large-new-gene-t7hrXULrFC
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006178511787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A detailed analysis of the currently available Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequence has revealed the presence of a large number of open reading frames with homology to the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S) genes of Papaver rhoeas. The products of these potential genes are all predicted to be relatively small, basic, secreted proteins with similar predicted secondary structures. We have named these potential genes SPH (S-protein homologues). Their presence appears to have been largely missed by the prediction methods currently used on the genomic sequence. Equivalent homologues could not be detected in the human, microbial, Drosophila or C. elegans genomic databases, suggesting a function specific to plants. Preliminary RT-PCR analysis indicates that at least two members of the family (SPH1, SPH8) are expressed, with expression being greatest in floral tissues. The gene family may total more than 100 members, and its discovery not only illustrates the importance of the genome sequencing efforts, but also indicates the extent of information which remains hidden after the initial trawl for potential genes.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 19, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off