An overview of the apple genome through BAC end sequence analysis

An overview of the apple genome through BAC end sequence analysis The apple, Malus × domestica Borkh., is one of the most important fruit trees grown worldwide. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map of the apple genome has been recently constructed. Based on this physical map, a total of ∼2,100 clones from different contigs (overlapping BAC clones) have been selected and sequenced at both ends, generating 3,744 high-quality BAC end sequences (BESs) including 1,717 BAC end pairs. Approximately 8.5% of BESs contain simple sequence repeats (SSRs), most of which are AT/TA dimer repeats. Potential transposable elements are identified in ∼21% of BESs, and most of these elements are retrotransposons. About 11% of BESs have homology to the Arabidopsis protein database. The matched proteins cover a broad range of categories. The average GC content of the predicted coding regions of BESs is 42.4%; while, that of the whole BESs is 39%. A small number of BES pairs were mapped to neighboring chromosome regions of A. thaliana and Populus trichocarpa; whereas, no pairs are mapped to the Oryza sativa genome. The apple has a higher degree of synteny with the closely related Populus than with the distantly related Arabidopsis. BAC end sequencing can be used to anchor a small proportion of the apple genome to the Populus and possibly to the Arabidopsis genomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

An overview of the apple genome through BAC end sequence analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-008-9321-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The apple, Malus × domestica Borkh., is one of the most important fruit trees grown worldwide. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map of the apple genome has been recently constructed. Based on this physical map, a total of ∼2,100 clones from different contigs (overlapping BAC clones) have been selected and sequenced at both ends, generating 3,744 high-quality BAC end sequences (BESs) including 1,717 BAC end pairs. Approximately 8.5% of BESs contain simple sequence repeats (SSRs), most of which are AT/TA dimer repeats. Potential transposable elements are identified in ∼21% of BESs, and most of these elements are retrotransposons. About 11% of BESs have homology to the Arabidopsis protein database. The matched proteins cover a broad range of categories. The average GC content of the predicted coding regions of BESs is 42.4%; while, that of the whole BESs is 39%. A small number of BES pairs were mapped to neighboring chromosome regions of A. thaliana and Populus trichocarpa; whereas, no pairs are mapped to the Oryza sativa genome. The apple has a higher degree of synteny with the closely related Populus than with the distantly related Arabidopsis. BAC end sequencing can be used to anchor a small proportion of the apple genome to the Populus and possibly to the Arabidopsis genomes.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 3, 2008

References

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