An organ of equilibrium in deep-sea isopods revealed: the statocyst of Macrostylidae (Crustacea, Peracarida, Janiroidea)

An organ of equilibrium in deep-sea isopods revealed: the statocyst of Macrostylidae (Crustacea,... Isopoda (Crustacea, Peracarida) from the deep sea are relatively well studied but little is known about their lifestyles or the functional morphology and anatomy. The isopod family Macrostylidae, for example, is rather small in size, usually less than 1 cm in body length, and occurs mainly in the deep sea between 3000–6000 m. This family features a paired subepidermal structure on the posterior end of the pleotelson. It has been reported only in this family and was first mentioned by Hansen in 1916, who hypothesised that it represents a pair of statocysts. Nevertheless, neither the structure nor the function has been investigated until now. The shape of some related features, however, has already been used for species differentiation thus indicating that phylogenetically as well as systematically valuable information may be inherent in this feature. Here, the anatomy of this structure was studied based on four species of Macrostylidae from the North Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. It was digitally reconstructed from histological sections. The paired structure comprised two tergal invaginations, each with distinct muscular attachments and a modified seta that distally held a statocyst on the shaft. This resembles equilibrium organs reported from other organisms and thus the statocysts hypothesis seems reliable. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the substance of the statolith could be determined as silicon dioxide. Based on these findings, the function of this organ and its potential phylogenetic and ecological implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zoomorphology Springer Journals

An organ of equilibrium in deep-sea isopods revealed: the statocyst of Macrostylidae (Crustacea, Peracarida, Janiroidea)

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Life Sciences; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Developmental Biology; Evolutionary Biology; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography
ISSN
0720-213X
eISSN
1432-234X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00435-017-0376-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Isopoda (Crustacea, Peracarida) from the deep sea are relatively well studied but little is known about their lifestyles or the functional morphology and anatomy. The isopod family Macrostylidae, for example, is rather small in size, usually less than 1 cm in body length, and occurs mainly in the deep sea between 3000–6000 m. This family features a paired subepidermal structure on the posterior end of the pleotelson. It has been reported only in this family and was first mentioned by Hansen in 1916, who hypothesised that it represents a pair of statocysts. Nevertheless, neither the structure nor the function has been investigated until now. The shape of some related features, however, has already been used for species differentiation thus indicating that phylogenetically as well as systematically valuable information may be inherent in this feature. Here, the anatomy of this structure was studied based on four species of Macrostylidae from the North Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. It was digitally reconstructed from histological sections. The paired structure comprised two tergal invaginations, each with distinct muscular attachments and a modified seta that distally held a statocyst on the shaft. This resembles equilibrium organs reported from other organisms and thus the statocysts hypothesis seems reliable. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the substance of the statolith could be determined as silicon dioxide. Based on these findings, the function of this organ and its potential phylogenetic and ecological implications are discussed.

Journal

ZoomorphologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 21, 2017

References

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