Aminoacidopathies: Prevalence, Etiology, Screening, and Treatment Options

Aminoacidopathies: Prevalence, Etiology, Screening, and Treatment Options Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders which are caused by mutations in the specific genes that lead to impaired proteins or enzymes production. Different metabolic pathways are perturbed due to the deficiency or lack of enzymes. To date, more than 500 IEMs have been reported with most of them being untreatable. However, fortunately 91 such disorders are potentially treatable, if diagnosed at an earlier stage of life. IEMs have been classified into different categories and one class of IEMs, characterized by the physiological disturbances of amino acids is called as aminoacidopathies. Out of 91 treatable IEM, thirteen disorders are amino acid related. Aminoacidopathies can be detected by chromatography and mass spectrometry based analytical techniques (e.g., HPLC, GC–MS, LC–MS/MS) for amino acid level changes, and through genetic assays (e.g., PCR, TaqMan Genotyping, DNA sequencing) at the mutation level in the corresponding genes. Hence, this review is focused to describe thirteen common aminoacidopathies namely: Phenylketonuria (PKU), Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), Homocystinuria/Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) deficiency, Tyrosinemia type II, Citrullinemia type I and type II, Argininosuccinic aciduria, Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase I (CPS) deficiency, Argininemia (arginase deficiency), Hyperornithinemia–Hyperammonemia–Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, N-Acetylglutamate Synthase (NAGS) deficiency, Ornithine Transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase (PDH) complex deficiency. Furthermore, the etiology, prevalence and commonly used analytical techniques for screening of aminoacidopathies are briefly described. This information would be helpful to researchers and clinicians especially from developing countries to initiate newborn screening programs for aminoacidopathies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biochemical Genetics Springer Journals

Aminoacidopathies: Prevalence, Etiology, Screening, and Treatment Options

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Biochemistry, general; Zoology; Medical Microbiology
ISSN
0006-2928
eISSN
1573-4927
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10528-017-9825-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders which are caused by mutations in the specific genes that lead to impaired proteins or enzymes production. Different metabolic pathways are perturbed due to the deficiency or lack of enzymes. To date, more than 500 IEMs have been reported with most of them being untreatable. However, fortunately 91 such disorders are potentially treatable, if diagnosed at an earlier stage of life. IEMs have been classified into different categories and one class of IEMs, characterized by the physiological disturbances of amino acids is called as aminoacidopathies. Out of 91 treatable IEM, thirteen disorders are amino acid related. Aminoacidopathies can be detected by chromatography and mass spectrometry based analytical techniques (e.g., HPLC, GC–MS, LC–MS/MS) for amino acid level changes, and through genetic assays (e.g., PCR, TaqMan Genotyping, DNA sequencing) at the mutation level in the corresponding genes. Hence, this review is focused to describe thirteen common aminoacidopathies namely: Phenylketonuria (PKU), Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), Homocystinuria/Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) deficiency, Tyrosinemia type II, Citrullinemia type I and type II, Argininosuccinic aciduria, Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase I (CPS) deficiency, Argininemia (arginase deficiency), Hyperornithinemia–Hyperammonemia–Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, N-Acetylglutamate Synthase (NAGS) deficiency, Ornithine Transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase (PDH) complex deficiency. Furthermore, the etiology, prevalence and commonly used analytical techniques for screening of aminoacidopathies are briefly described. This information would be helpful to researchers and clinicians especially from developing countries to initiate newborn screening programs for aminoacidopathies.

Journal

Biochemical GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 2017

References

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