Algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device for generation of bioelectricity using Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanophyta)

Algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device for generation of bioelectricity using Synechococcus elongatus... The exploitation of renewable energy sources for delivering carbon neutral or carbon negative solutions has become challenging in the current era because conventional fuel sources are of finite origins. Algae are being used in the development of biophotovoltaic (BPV) platforms which are used to harvest solar energy for bioelectricity generation. Fast-growing algae have a high potential for converting CO from the atmosphere into biomass and valuable products. In photosynthesis light-driven splitting of water occurs, releasing a pair of electrons and generating O . The electrons can be harvested and converted to bioelectricity. In this study, algal biofilms of a tropical cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105) were formed on two types of electrodes, indium tin oxide (ITO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and investigated for use in the algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device. The highest maximum power density was registered in the rGO-based BPV device (0.538 ± −2 0.014 mW m ). This illustrates the potential of this local algal strain for use in BPV devices to generate bioelectricity in both the light and dark conditions. . . Keywords Algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device Bioelectricity Cyanophyta Introduction develop low carbon technologies and how to capture and store radiant energy for societal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Phycology Springer Journals

Algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device for generation of bioelectricity using Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanophyta)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/algal-biophotovoltaic-bpv-device-for-generation-of-bioelectricity-u8VRorKSWH
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Physiology; Ecology
ISSN
0921-8971
eISSN
1573-5176
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10811-018-1515-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The exploitation of renewable energy sources for delivering carbon neutral or carbon negative solutions has become challenging in the current era because conventional fuel sources are of finite origins. Algae are being used in the development of biophotovoltaic (BPV) platforms which are used to harvest solar energy for bioelectricity generation. Fast-growing algae have a high potential for converting CO from the atmosphere into biomass and valuable products. In photosynthesis light-driven splitting of water occurs, releasing a pair of electrons and generating O . The electrons can be harvested and converted to bioelectricity. In this study, algal biofilms of a tropical cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105) were formed on two types of electrodes, indium tin oxide (ITO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and investigated for use in the algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device. The highest maximum power density was registered in the rGO-based BPV device (0.538 ± −2 0.014 mW m ). This illustrates the potential of this local algal strain for use in BPV devices to generate bioelectricity in both the light and dark conditions. . . Keywords Algal biophotovoltaic (BPV) device Bioelectricity Cyanophyta Introduction develop low carbon technologies and how to capture and store radiant energy for societal

Journal

Journal of Applied PhycologySpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off