Agricultural diversification reduces the survival period of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia

Agricultural diversification reduces the survival period of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia Sclerotia produced by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are the central component of epidemics as they are long-term survival structures. Integrated crop-livestock systems (ICLSs) are sustainable options for agricultural diversification; however, there are few studies about its influence on plant diseases. This work investigated the influence of two arrangements of ICLS: agropastoral (AP) and agrosilvopastoral (ASP) compared to a non- integrated crop (CO) on the survival period of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia, buried and on the soil surface. The study was conducted in a long-term ICLS experiment with two factors: production system with three levels (AP, ASP and CO), and nitrogen (N) doses on the winter pasture with two levels: 90 and 180 kg/ha. Sclerotia of a native S. sclerotiorum strain were multiplied, put in the field and evaluated periodically for 22 months when buried and 14 months when on the soil surface. Microorganisms grown in non-germinated sclerotia were tested as antagonists of the native and two exogenous strains of S. sclerotiorum. Sclerotia left on the soil surface had a lower survival period than the buried sclerotia and survived for 13 months. When buried, the survival period was lower in the ASP than in the AP system. When on the soil surface the survival period was lower in the AP system than in the CO and ASP. The native S. sclerotiorum sclerotia germinated less than the exogenous strains after being treated with the native microorganisms. These results show a reduction in the survival period of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia promoted by ICLSs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plant Pathology Springer Journals

Agricultural diversification reduces the survival period of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Koninklijke Nederlandse Planteziektenkundige Vereniging
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Plant Sciences; Ecology; Agriculture; Life Sciences, general
ISSN
0929-1873
eISSN
1573-8469
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10658-017-1405-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sclerotia produced by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are the central component of epidemics as they are long-term survival structures. Integrated crop-livestock systems (ICLSs) are sustainable options for agricultural diversification; however, there are few studies about its influence on plant diseases. This work investigated the influence of two arrangements of ICLS: agropastoral (AP) and agrosilvopastoral (ASP) compared to a non- integrated crop (CO) on the survival period of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia, buried and on the soil surface. The study was conducted in a long-term ICLS experiment with two factors: production system with three levels (AP, ASP and CO), and nitrogen (N) doses on the winter pasture with two levels: 90 and 180 kg/ha. Sclerotia of a native S. sclerotiorum strain were multiplied, put in the field and evaluated periodically for 22 months when buried and 14 months when on the soil surface. Microorganisms grown in non-germinated sclerotia were tested as antagonists of the native and two exogenous strains of S. sclerotiorum. Sclerotia left on the soil surface had a lower survival period than the buried sclerotia and survived for 13 months. When buried, the survival period was lower in the ASP than in the AP system. When on the soil surface the survival period was lower in the AP system than in the CO and ASP. The native S. sclerotiorum sclerotia germinated less than the exogenous strains after being treated with the native microorganisms. These results show a reduction in the survival period of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia promoted by ICLSs.

Journal

European Journal of Plant PathologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 23, 2017

References

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