Adipokine genetics: Unbalanced protein secretion by human adipose tissue as a cause of the metabolic syndrome

Adipokine genetics: Unbalanced protein secretion by human adipose tissue as a cause of the... Subcutaneous and visceral adipose compartments act, not only as fatty acid depots, but also as active endocrine organs that undergo hyperplastic changes and significantly enhance their function in obesity. Adipokines and other proteins secreted by both adipocytes and stromal cells play a central role in peripheral insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MS). Minor alleles of the adipokine genes substantially contribute to MS. The most important consequence of MS is low-level systemic inflammation supported by adiposespecific synthesis of proinflammatory soluble molecules. Proinflammatory signals are secreted into the bloodstream and spread to peripheral tissues that express their receptors. The signals provided by adipose tissue stimulate the development of secondary complications of MS, including cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The review describes the physiological effects of adiponectin, leptin, resistin, visfatin, and apelin and the influence of the minor alleles of the adipokine genes on the development of the secondary complications of MS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Adipokine genetics: Unbalanced protein secretion by human adipose tissue as a cause of the metabolic syndrome

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by MAIK Nauka
Subject
Biomedicine; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795408100050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Subcutaneous and visceral adipose compartments act, not only as fatty acid depots, but also as active endocrine organs that undergo hyperplastic changes and significantly enhance their function in obesity. Adipokines and other proteins secreted by both adipocytes and stromal cells play a central role in peripheral insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MS). Minor alleles of the adipokine genes substantially contribute to MS. The most important consequence of MS is low-level systemic inflammation supported by adiposespecific synthesis of proinflammatory soluble molecules. Proinflammatory signals are secreted into the bloodstream and spread to peripheral tissues that express their receptors. The signals provided by adipose tissue stimulate the development of secondary complications of MS, including cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The review describes the physiological effects of adiponectin, leptin, resistin, visfatin, and apelin and the influence of the minor alleles of the adipokine genes on the development of the secondary complications of MS.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2008

References

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