Achieving sub-1.6-nm resolutions of a low-voltage microscopic focused-ion-beam system not involving aberration correction

Achieving sub-1.6-nm resolutions of a low-voltage microscopic focused-ion-beam system not... The final, second, part is presented of an investigation into possible methods of achieving the ultimate resolution for focused-ion-beam (FIB) microscopes. Our strategy differs from the well-known FIB technologies in the following respects: (i) It employs an advanced ion source of effective radius ≈1 nm. (ii) The ion energy at the target is as low as −300 eV. (iii) Potential secondary emission of ions and electrons is used as a means of imaging at the nanometer scale. The version in part 1 relies on a chromatic-aberration correction system based on a combined electromagnetic mirror. As an alternative, we here propose reducing the ion-optical system to a scale of tens of micrometers. It is shown by computer simulation that the resolution thus obtained should be as good as the one reported in part 1 (∼1.6 nm). Under optimal imaging conditions, the ion-beam current on a target is found to depend only on the properties of the ion source and to be the same as those of macroscopic FIB systems regardless of their operating voltage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Microelectronics Springer Journals

Achieving sub-1.6-nm resolutions of a low-voltage microscopic focused-ion-beam system not involving aberration correction

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Engineering; Electrical Engineering
ISSN
1063-7397
eISSN
1608-3415
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1063739708020030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The final, second, part is presented of an investigation into possible methods of achieving the ultimate resolution for focused-ion-beam (FIB) microscopes. Our strategy differs from the well-known FIB technologies in the following respects: (i) It employs an advanced ion source of effective radius ≈1 nm. (ii) The ion energy at the target is as low as −300 eV. (iii) Potential secondary emission of ions and electrons is used as a means of imaging at the nanometer scale. The version in part 1 relies on a chromatic-aberration correction system based on a combined electromagnetic mirror. As an alternative, we here propose reducing the ion-optical system to a scale of tens of micrometers. It is shown by computer simulation that the resolution thus obtained should be as good as the one reported in part 1 (∼1.6 nm). Under optimal imaging conditions, the ion-beam current on a target is found to depend only on the properties of the ion source and to be the same as those of macroscopic FIB systems regardless of their operating voltage.

Journal

Russian MicroelectronicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 19, 2011

References

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