Accumulation, fractionation, and risk assessment of mercury and arsenic in the soil-wheat system from the wastewater-irrigated soil in Baiyin, northwest China

Accumulation, fractionation, and risk assessment of mercury and arsenic in the soil-wheat system... Wastewater irrigation can increase metal concentrations in soil and wheat, thereby posing metal-associated health risk via food ingestion. We investigated levels of mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) in roots, husks, stems, leaves, and grains of wheat and their fractionations in farmland soil from Baiyin City, an industrial and mining city, northwest China. Results show that the mean concentrations of Hg in soils from Dongdagou and Xidagou stream in Baiyin were 8.5 times and three times higher than local soil background values, respectively. Those of As were 4.5 times and 1.6 times higher, respectively. Most Hg and As were mainly accumulated in wheat leaves. The spatial distributions of As in soils and grains exhibit a very similar pattern, which suggest that As pollution in soils might be predicted by its level in wheat grains. Residual fractions for Hg (RES-Hg) and As (RES-As) are the highest compared to other fractions, indicating weak mobility of Hg and As in soil. The crop oral intake hazard quotients of both Hg and As for children were approximately two times higher than that for adults, indicating that children have higher exposure risks to Hg- and As-contaminated wheat. The crop oral intake was the main route of exposure causing non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk for local residents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Accumulation, fractionation, and risk assessment of mercury and arsenic in the soil-wheat system from the wastewater-irrigated soil in Baiyin, northwest China

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-1641-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wastewater irrigation can increase metal concentrations in soil and wheat, thereby posing metal-associated health risk via food ingestion. We investigated levels of mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) in roots, husks, stems, leaves, and grains of wheat and their fractionations in farmland soil from Baiyin City, an industrial and mining city, northwest China. Results show that the mean concentrations of Hg in soils from Dongdagou and Xidagou stream in Baiyin were 8.5 times and three times higher than local soil background values, respectively. Those of As were 4.5 times and 1.6 times higher, respectively. Most Hg and As were mainly accumulated in wheat leaves. The spatial distributions of As in soils and grains exhibit a very similar pattern, which suggest that As pollution in soils might be predicted by its level in wheat grains. Residual fractions for Hg (RES-Hg) and As (RES-As) are the highest compared to other fractions, indicating weak mobility of Hg and As in soil. The crop oral intake hazard quotients of both Hg and As for children were approximately two times higher than that for adults, indicating that children have higher exposure risks to Hg- and As-contaminated wheat. The crop oral intake was the main route of exposure causing non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk for local residents.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 15, 2018

References

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