Acclimation of the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus to Decreased Salinity at the Blastula and Gastrula Stages: Its Effect on the Desalination Resistance of Larvae at Subsequent Stages of Development

Acclimation of the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus to Decreased Salinity at the Blastula and... Apostichopus (= Stichopus) japonicus blastulae and gastrulae were acclimated for 18 h to salinities of 32‰ (control), 24 and 22‰ (the lower limit of the range of tolerance), and 20‰ (below the range of tolerance). Acclimation to 20‰ resulted in the appearance of teratic larvae, most of which subsequently died. Acclimation to 24, 22, and 20‰ led to a shift in the range of tolerance of the larvae at further stages of development. With a decrease in salinity, acclimated larvae developed more successfully than unacclimated larvae. Acclimated larvae attained the pentactula stage and settled at a salinity range of 32–20‰; unacclimated larvae, at 32–22‰. At different stages of development, acclimated larvae survived greater decreases in salinity than unacclimated larvae. The acclimation effects could be traced up to metamorphosis and settling, i.e., two weeks after the end of the acclimation process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Acclimation of the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus to Decreased Salinity at the Blastula and Gastrula Stages: Its Effect on the Desalination Resistance of Larvae at Subsequent Stages of Development

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1009446705230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Apostichopus (= Stichopus) japonicus blastulae and gastrulae were acclimated for 18 h to salinities of 32‰ (control), 24 and 22‰ (the lower limit of the range of tolerance), and 20‰ (below the range of tolerance). Acclimation to 20‰ resulted in the appearance of teratic larvae, most of which subsequently died. Acclimation to 24, 22, and 20‰ led to a shift in the range of tolerance of the larvae at further stages of development. With a decrease in salinity, acclimated larvae developed more successfully than unacclimated larvae. Acclimated larvae attained the pentactula stage and settled at a salinity range of 32–20‰; unacclimated larvae, at 32–22‰. At different stages of development, acclimated larvae survived greater decreases in salinity than unacclimated larvae. The acclimation effects could be traced up to metamorphosis and settling, i.e., two weeks after the end of the acclimation process.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 8, 2004

References

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