Accelerated rates of protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes might be legacy of domestication

Accelerated rates of protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes might be legacy of... Traits related to grain and reproductive organs in grass crops have been under continuous directional selection during domestication. Barley is one of the oldest domesticated crops in human history. Thus genes associated with the grain and reproductive organs in barley may show evidence of dramatic evolutionary change. To understand how artificial selection contributes to protein evolution of biased genes in different barley organs, we used Digital Gene Expression analysis of six barley organs (grain, pistil, anther, leaf, stem and root) to identify genes with biased expression in specific organs. Pairwise comparisons of orthologs between barley and Brachypodium distachyon, as well as between highland and lowland barley cultivars mutually indicated that grain and pistil biased genes show relatively higher protein evolutionary rates compared with the median of all orthologs and other organ biased genes. Lineage-specific protein evolutionary rates estimation showed similar patterns with elevated protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes, yet protein sequences generally evolve much faster in the lowland barley cultivar. Further functional annotations revealed that some of these grain and pistil biased genes with rapid protein evolution are related to nutrient biosynthesis and cell cycle/division. Our analyses provide insights into how domestication differentially shaped the evolution of genes specific to different organs of a crop species, and implications for future functional studies of domestication genes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Accelerated rates of protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes might be legacy of domestication

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-015-0366-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traits related to grain and reproductive organs in grass crops have been under continuous directional selection during domestication. Barley is one of the oldest domesticated crops in human history. Thus genes associated with the grain and reproductive organs in barley may show evidence of dramatic evolutionary change. To understand how artificial selection contributes to protein evolution of biased genes in different barley organs, we used Digital Gene Expression analysis of six barley organs (grain, pistil, anther, leaf, stem and root) to identify genes with biased expression in specific organs. Pairwise comparisons of orthologs between barley and Brachypodium distachyon, as well as between highland and lowland barley cultivars mutually indicated that grain and pistil biased genes show relatively higher protein evolutionary rates compared with the median of all orthologs and other organ biased genes. Lineage-specific protein evolutionary rates estimation showed similar patterns with elevated protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes, yet protein sequences generally evolve much faster in the lowland barley cultivar. Further functional annotations revealed that some of these grain and pistil biased genes with rapid protein evolution are related to nutrient biosynthesis and cell cycle/division. Our analyses provide insights into how domestication differentially shaped the evolution of genes specific to different organs of a crop species, and implications for future functional studies of domestication genes.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 11, 2015

References

  • Comparative analysis of syntenic genes in grass genomes reveals accelerated rates of gene structure and coding sequence evolution in polyploid wheat
    Akhunov, ED; Sehgal, S; Liang, H; Wang, S; Akhunova, AR; Kaur, G; Li, W; Forrest, KL; See, D; Simkova, H; Ma, Y; Hayden, MJ; Luo, M; Faris, JD; Dolezel, J; Gill, BS
  • Full-length transcriptome assembly from RNA-Seq data without a reference genome
    Grabherr, MG; Haas, BJ; Yassour, M; Levin, JZ; Thompson, DA; Amit, I; Adiconis, X; Fan, L; Raychowdhury, R; Zeng, Q; Chen, Z; Mauceli, E; Hacohen, N; Gnirke, A; Rhind, N; Palma, F; Birren, BW; Nusbaum, C; Lindblad-Toh, K; Friedman, N; Regev, A
  • Redundant proteolytic mechanisms process seed storage proteins in the absence of seed-type members of the vacuolar processing enzyme family of cysteine proteases
    Gruis, DF; Selinger, DA; Curran, JM; Jung, R

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