Aboriginal Community-Level Predictors of Injury-Related Hospitalizations in British Columbia, Canada

Aboriginal Community-Level Predictors of Injury-Related Hospitalizations in British Columbia, Canada Population-level statistics indicating disparities in injury rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations disguise considerable community-level heterogeneity. Using an ecological approach, we analyzed linked data from British Columbia’s (BC) universal health care insurance plan, worker compensation, vital statistics, and census databases to identify community-level risk markers for hospitalization due to injury among the Aboriginal population of BC, Canada. Community standardized relative risks (SRR) of injury hospitalization relative to the total population of BC ranged from 0.24 to 9.35. Variables associated with increased SRRs included the following: higher proportions of crowded housing, housing in poor condition, participating in industries with greater risk of a work injury claim, being more remote, and at higher latitude. Higher income and more high school graduates were protective. In the best-fitting multivariable model, variables independently associated with SRR were proportion of the population with a high school certificate (RR = 0.89 per unit standard deviation change, 95 % confidence interval 0.83 to 0.94), and remoteness index (RR = 1.06, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.11). Results confirm profound diversity in Aboriginal communities across BC. SRRs of injury hospitalization increased as proportion of high school graduates dropped and remoteness increased. Promoting the educational attainment of community members should be an important focus of initiatives to improve health. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Aboriginal Community-Level Predictors of Injury-Related Hospitalizations in British Columbia, Canada

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-014-0503-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Population-level statistics indicating disparities in injury rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations disguise considerable community-level heterogeneity. Using an ecological approach, we analyzed linked data from British Columbia’s (BC) universal health care insurance plan, worker compensation, vital statistics, and census databases to identify community-level risk markers for hospitalization due to injury among the Aboriginal population of BC, Canada. Community standardized relative risks (SRR) of injury hospitalization relative to the total population of BC ranged from 0.24 to 9.35. Variables associated with increased SRRs included the following: higher proportions of crowded housing, housing in poor condition, participating in industries with greater risk of a work injury claim, being more remote, and at higher latitude. Higher income and more high school graduates were protective. In the best-fitting multivariable model, variables independently associated with SRR were proportion of the population with a high school certificate (RR = 0.89 per unit standard deviation change, 95 % confidence interval 0.83 to 0.94), and remoteness index (RR = 1.06, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.11). Results confirm profound diversity in Aboriginal communities across BC. SRRs of injury hospitalization increased as proportion of high school graduates dropped and remoteness increased. Promoting the educational attainment of community members should be an important focus of initiatives to improve health.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 16, 2014

References

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