A wandering Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Trindade Island, Brazil: the extreme sighting of a circumpolar species

A wandering Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Trindade Island, Brazil: the extreme... Records of vagrant marine organisms provide important information on oceanographic anomalies and the changing environment. We report on an immature Weddell seal, Leptonychotes weddellii, sighted at Calheta Beach in Trindade Island (20°31′S 29°19′W), Brazil, on July 9, 2015. A number of injuries were noted, including blisters on the dorsal surface of the body and a small cut at the right-hand side distal portion of the mandible. Based on its size and the state of fusion of cranial sutures, we suggest that it was born in the 2014 austral spring and was possibly 8–10 months old. We suggest that it comes from the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula. This is the closest breeding location of this species. This sighting is the northernmost of L. weddellii, being at least ~ 5140 km from the Antarctic Peninsula (63°12′S 55°04′W) and ~ 2840 km north from the second northernmost sighting of this species in Uruguay. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Polar Biology Springer Journals

A wandering Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Trindade Island, Brazil: the extreme sighting of a circumpolar species

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Plant Sciences; Zoology
ISSN
0722-4060
eISSN
1432-2056
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00300-017-2218-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Records of vagrant marine organisms provide important information on oceanographic anomalies and the changing environment. We report on an immature Weddell seal, Leptonychotes weddellii, sighted at Calheta Beach in Trindade Island (20°31′S 29°19′W), Brazil, on July 9, 2015. A number of injuries were noted, including blisters on the dorsal surface of the body and a small cut at the right-hand side distal portion of the mandible. Based on its size and the state of fusion of cranial sutures, we suggest that it was born in the 2014 austral spring and was possibly 8–10 months old. We suggest that it comes from the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula. This is the closest breeding location of this species. This sighting is the northernmost of L. weddellii, being at least ~ 5140 km from the Antarctic Peninsula (63°12′S 55°04′W) and ~ 2840 km north from the second northernmost sighting of this species in Uruguay.

Journal

Polar BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 19, 2017

References

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