A unique juxtaglomerular apparatus in the river ray, Potamotrygon humerosa, a freshwater stingray

A unique juxtaglomerular apparatus in the river ray, Potamotrygon humerosa, a freshwater stingray The microscopic architecture of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) of the renal corpuscle of a stenohaline freshwater stingray, the river ray (Potamotrygon humerosa), was studied using light microscopy of histologic sections, three-dimensional reconstruction using 1 micron epoxy resin serial sections and transmission electron microscopy. The glomeruli studied were located medially in the kidney and had a single afferent arteriole but multiple, up to 11, efferent arterioles which exited the glomerular capillary loops along a deep indentation, termed vascular groove, of Bowman’s capsule. This groove extended from the afferent arteriole to the urinary pole where the renal tubule began. In this groove lay the distal tubule in contact with the glomerular mesangium and covering the multiple efferent arterioles. This portion of the distal tubule had specialized epithelial cells, the macula densa, typical of those in JGAs of all other phylogenetic groups. Along the entire groove on the inside of Bowman’s capsule lay the transition of the parietal to visceral epithelium where specialized cells, peripolar cells, were present. Granules in these peripolar cells were present only at the epithelial transition adjacent to the afferent arteriole and not adjacent to the efferent arterioles. In conclusion, the unique anatomical JGA in a population of river ray renal corpuscles suggests they have a different function in the glomerular feedback system than that classically described in mammals. Considering that in the same river ray kidney there are other populations of glomeruli which possess the classically described JGA and also that there are newly forming glomeruli suggest that a spectrum of differing glomerular function exists within each kidney. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zoomorphology Springer Journals

A unique juxtaglomerular apparatus in the river ray, Potamotrygon humerosa, a freshwater stingray

Zoomorphology , Volume 137 (1) – Aug 31, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/a-unique-juxtaglomerular-apparatus-in-the-river-ray-potamotrygon-DJ0PZzQmzx
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Life Sciences; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Developmental Biology; Evolutionary Biology; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography
ISSN
0720-213X
eISSN
1432-234X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00435-017-0372-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The microscopic architecture of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) of the renal corpuscle of a stenohaline freshwater stingray, the river ray (Potamotrygon humerosa), was studied using light microscopy of histologic sections, three-dimensional reconstruction using 1 micron epoxy resin serial sections and transmission electron microscopy. The glomeruli studied were located medially in the kidney and had a single afferent arteriole but multiple, up to 11, efferent arterioles which exited the glomerular capillary loops along a deep indentation, termed vascular groove, of Bowman’s capsule. This groove extended from the afferent arteriole to the urinary pole where the renal tubule began. In this groove lay the distal tubule in contact with the glomerular mesangium and covering the multiple efferent arterioles. This portion of the distal tubule had specialized epithelial cells, the macula densa, typical of those in JGAs of all other phylogenetic groups. Along the entire groove on the inside of Bowman’s capsule lay the transition of the parietal to visceral epithelium where specialized cells, peripolar cells, were present. Granules in these peripolar cells were present only at the epithelial transition adjacent to the afferent arteriole and not adjacent to the efferent arterioles. In conclusion, the unique anatomical JGA in a population of river ray renal corpuscles suggests they have a different function in the glomerular feedback system than that classically described in mammals. Considering that in the same river ray kidney there are other populations of glomeruli which possess the classically described JGA and also that there are newly forming glomeruli suggest that a spectrum of differing glomerular function exists within each kidney.

Journal

ZoomorphologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 31, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off